The Coming Authoritarianism.

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Who loves ya, baby?
Nice, wasn't aware of that. But how do you think "open-source" would fare, in terms of marketing? Would it be met with skepticism similar to that which Wikipedia is met with?
What sort of skepticism is Wikipedia met with? Don't millions of people use it every day?
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
What sort of skepticism is Wikipedia met with? Don't millions of people use it every day?
More of a petty academic skepticism. Like, "where did you get your facts? Don't tell me Wikipedia?"

Sure, "swarm-vetting" has its pitfalls, but it also has profound potential benefits.

A number of people at a dinner party provide a guess, on a paper, regarding the number of jelly beans in the jar. I believe it has been shown that, as the number of guesses increases, the average guess more closely approximates the correct answer.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
If you apply that swarm technique to more dimensional problems, more robust diagnoses, you are surely liable to be met with errors that would otherwise have been avoided in a more traditional vetting process. But you are also more likely to avoid bias, no? That is, if the voices can effectively be averaged together, which is infinitely easier to do with numbers than it is with statements.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I guess you'd run into people assuming the product was worse due to no money being exchanged, but whether that would outweigh the desire for free stuff without the shady bits, I don't know. I think if you were to bundle all laptops with one of the more accessible Linux distros then people would just get on with it.
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
I think the hurdles are brand recognition, accessibility and the assumption that anything private/proprietary must be of higher quality.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm

[Tim Kendell] “Tobacco companies initially just sought to make nicotine more potent,” he said. “But eventually that wasn’t enough to grow the business as fast as they wanted. And so they added sugar and menthol to cigarettes so you could hold the smoke in your lungs for longer periods. At Facebook, we added status updates, photo tagging, and likes, which made status and reputation primary and laid the groundwork for a teenage mental health crisis.”

“The social media services that I and others have built over the past 15 years have served to tear people apart with alarming speed and intensity,” Kendall said in his opening testimony. “At the very least, we have eroded our collective understanding — at worst, I fear we are pushing ourselves to the brink of a civil war.”
 

catalog

Well-known member
this is kind of disturbing... made me think of thirdform's protestations about the like button and yyaldrin's concerns over the roundness of new dissensus theme. all the different reacts we've got now, it kind of is about retaining interest and facilitating addiction. what's weird for me is that in my work we are now using 'Teams' and it has all the same stuff - quick emoji reacts, and you can see when someone's typing etc. it's all coming together, we need to be permanently glued to the screen in work and leisure
 

version

Who loves ya, baby?
"The findings suggest that Far Right groups were less interested in spreading misinformation and fear about the virus than they were in promoting themselves as responsible actors in a time of crisis. In fact, they were often highly critical of national governments for not implementing stronger lockdown measures earlier and would showcase their community work supporting groups they saw as vulnerable to COVID-19.

[...]

In response to COVID-19, we also see many Far Right groups attempting to demonstrate Resilience-building. This includes activities such as care for elderly or economically-disadvantaged communities, support of local businesses or workers’ rights, or volunteering with the Red Cross or donating blood to hospitals."
 
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