catalog

Well-known member
One of the new signs that I saw on the roads recently was something along the lines of:

"Football's coming home. Let's make sure Covid isn't."

Something like that. I think there's been an irresponsibility there. I think that's been part of the issue with the reaction - so many different interests suddenly tying themselves to the football results.
 

linebaugh

Well-known member
delta variant has got me down. Ive thought that life would eventually normalize, not unaffected by covid but changed in such a way that the ultra mundane is maintained, all but imperceptible to my day to day, but Im less confident now.
 

catalog

Well-known member
Sorry to hear that. Has it made you feel really unwell then? Hopefully will clear up but I suppose you gotta just wait it out.
 

luka

Well-known member
theres no way anything goes back to normal life will be put under a series of increasingly draconian limitations its all downhill from here
 

woops

is not like other people
this is what you have to drink if you want to be like biscuit
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Pure UBU (pronounced ‘OO-BOO’) is named after our faithful canine friend ‘UBU’, a maverick, brim full of character and the unofficial protector of our secrets. God love him, the dog is mad, but an inspiration to all who enjoy doing what they do and who want to be loved for being what they are.
 

version

Well-known member
The writing's a little dull, but this is cool. Some stuff about ghosts, k-punk, the pandemic, Kent! (@Simon silverdollarcircle ), Neolithic sites;

"Abandoned houses, after all, are commonly believed to attract ghosts simply through the act of being left unattended. And what were our cities now, other than a vast expanse of potentially haunted spaces?"

 

version

Well-known member
I liked this observation,

"In May 2020, Brandwatch noticed that online searches for the occult and astrology had surged since March. These were accompanied by increasing numbers of claims on social media that users had recently seen ghosts. The New York Times contributed to the paranormal discourse with a report on “spectral roommates” in Los Angeles and Manhattan, as newly redeployed home workers started to notice odd presences in their usually overlooked domestic spaces. According to John E. L. Tenney, a ghost researcher quoted by the NYT, the phenomenon may have arisen in part from people being at home during normal working hours and registering (for the first time) the sounds of their walls and floors expanding and contracting with the heat cycles of the day. The inside equivalent of “touching grass”—call it “touching walls”—could bring with it, in other words, a sense of intense physical and affective connection with the house as a space and (potentially) a site of history and encounter . . .

. . . new homeworkers hearing unfamiliar creaks and groans in their living spaces may simply be registering the conversion of their homes into places of work, as though they could literally hear the walls and ceilings reconfiguring themselves according to this shift in work patterns."
 

version

Well-known member
"The New York Times contributed to the paranormal discourse with a report on “spectral roommates” in Los Angeles and Manhattan, as newly redeployed home workers started to notice odd presences in their usually overlooked domestic spaces.”

“Who is the third who walks always beside you?
When I count, there are only you and I together
But when I look ahead up the white road
There is always another one walking beside you
Gliding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded
I do not know whether a man or a woman
-But who is that on the other side of you?”

E5ten-VYXw-AYCC-r.jpg
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
I liked this observation,

"In May 2020, Brandwatch noticed that online searches for the occult and astrology had surged since March. These were accompanied by increasing numbers of claims on social media that users had recently seen ghosts. The New York Times contributed to the paranormal discourse with a report on “spectral roommates” in Los Angeles and Manhattan, as newly redeployed home workers started to notice odd presences in their usually overlooked domestic spaces. According to John E. L. Tenney, a ghost researcher quoted by the NYT, the phenomenon may have arisen in part from people being at home during normal working hours and registering (for the first time) the sounds of their walls and floors expanding and contracting with the heat cycles of the day. The inside equivalent of “touching grass”—call it “touching walls”—could bring with it, in other words, a sense of intense physical and affective connection with the house as a space and (potentially) a site of history and encounter . . .

. . . new homeworkers hearing unfamiliar creaks and groans in their living spaces may simply be registering the conversion of their homes into places of work, as though they could literally hear the walls and ceilings reconfiguring themselves according to this shift in work patterns."
There may have been at least as much touching wood as walls as workers whiled away the hours at their home PCs
 
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