dematerialisation in literature

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
and what you mean about the internet. the internet is still people. so if youre passionately outraged at such and such not liking your instagram post are you feeling passionately about the internet, or about other people and your status and etc
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
I guess SOME people... Feel PASSIONATE about THE INTERNET

Most people I know (and I know most people) feel ambivalent about it.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
and what you mean about the internet. the internet is still people. so if youre passionately outraged at such and such not liking your instagram post are you feeling passionately about the internet, or about other people and your status and etc
Interesting

The passionate feelings are there but they're short-lived. In my case, anyway.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
you told me you cant sleep any time someone has a pop at you on here! you just lie awake fantasising about some violent revenge! that's quite passionate!
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Yeah sorry I'm probably not being very clear! Thanks for taking the time to ask for clarification. I think #1 and #2 of your take are right on, though I'm gonna push back on "middlebrow" and say that the critical mentality which equates accessibility with compromised quality is itself a product of modernism, specifically the aristocratic, Mandarin, "pure" aesthetics folks like TS Eliot championed. In that light, and given the theoretical discrediting of formalism (incl. New Criticism, aesthetic autonomy, etc), I don't think we should take modernist taxonomies of taste too seriously.
Yeah that was a bit snidey... for what it's worth I don't agree with Self at all and I rather enjoyed Freedom./
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
I guess SOME people... Feel PASSIONATE about THE INTERNET
Most people I know (and I know most people) feel ambivalent about it.
I feel ambivalent in that I think some things about it are really good and some are really bad - that doesn't mean I don't feel passionate about it.
 

suspendedreason

Well-known member
i don't say that we're no longer interested in other people, just that the bonds are far weaker and shorter lived and the depth and intensity of our relationships has been greatly reduced, hence the kind of affectlessness of Less than Zero etc. it's a situation which is challenging to anyone wishing to write the social novel.
To be fair, Franzen is writing about upper-middle class Boomers living in a suburb of Minnesota. I can still imagine it's accurate and representative to portray gossip over barbeque sessions and white wine + appetizers before the kids' grade school theater recitals. As for us urbanites who dropped outta that way of life...
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
well we don't quite have a social field in that way any more, at least, not unless we live all our likes in a Kazak village surrounded by deep forest. all our aquantinces are casual, even our own famlies. friendships are fleeting and superficial. romances likewise. we rarely stay in one job for long and even if we do our workmates move on.

"You can’t make tragedies without social instability. The world’s stable now. People are happy; they get what they want, and the never want what they can’t get. They’re well off; they’re sage; they’re never ill; they’re not afraid of death; they’re blissfully ignorant of passion and old age; they’re plagued with no mothers or fathers; they’ve got no wives, or children, or lovers to feel strongly about; they’re so conditioned that they practically can’t help behaving as they ought to behave. And if anything should go wrong, there’s soma. Which you go and chuck out of the window in the name of liberty, Mr. Savage. Liberty!” he laughed. “Expecting Deltas to know what liberty is! And now expecting them to understand Othello!"
 
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