IdleRich

IdleRich
People will always want to get fucked up and dance till dawn, and someone has to put the music on for them. Whether that will still be a DJ as it's conventionally seen I dunno but surely something like.
 

version

Well-known member
Reading version's posts earlier about how kids aren't going to clubs anymore I was thinking about how many festivals there are now as a counterpoint to the idea that people aren't as interested in going to see DJs (and bands etc.). But of course that led me to thinking about how fucking expensive these festivals are these days, which presumably must price out all but the poshest kids.
That, or it forces people to duck clubbing in order to save for a couple of festivals each year.
 

Corpsey

bandz ahoy
I feel like the ubiquity of rap/trap must have taken the wind out of club music's sails a bit. Obviously rap music was about (and great) in the 90s and 2000s but I feel like in the UK at least it wasn't quite as mainstream, all pervasive and club-friendly as it is now.
 

boxedjoy

Well-known member
I think it wasn't really until the mid-00s that r&b and hip-hop felt so obviously designed to be played in clubs. Before it sounded good, as everything does in a club when you're full of altering substances, but it wasn't as explicitly intended for that purpose in the same way, at least to my ears.
 

version

Well-known member
Although illegal raves are also making a comeback with young people, the older generation is more sedentary. The first legal outdoor events to return have been socially distanced outdoor sit-down brunches dedicated to UK garage and drum’n’bass – pitched at over-30s. The whistle posse can make some noise again, as long as they consider the neighbours.

“I’ve long wanted a sit-down rave,” said Tom Latchem, a happy hardcore fan and TalkSport presenter who launched ROAR – the 90s rave podcast – earlier this month. Social media metrics show his entire audience so far is aged between 35 and 50.

“All the old-school events now are day raves, which tells you everything,” he said. “People are in their 40s, they can’t go out till 6am taking drugs. Most people aren’t dancing. They’re swaying about a bit with a pint.”
 
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version

Well-known member
"Wearing a matching Hawaiian shirt and shorts combination, a fedora and football scarf, Glen is not exactly dressed for the weather but his outfit screams optimism."

:ROFLMAO:
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Reminds me of playing five-a-side and it was time to head off to play but I couldn't find my shorts anywhere. My flatmate had a friend round who was a painter and decorator or something and he said "Oh I got some shorts I don't want in me van" - by now I was late so I was just "yeah gimme them" and obviously they were these ridiculously long bermuda shorts... I went to take the kick off and the striker from the other team said "You expecting good weather mate".
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
It was kinda embarrassing cos he was a good player, I always used to have an enjoyable battle with him but I started with a bit of a psychological disadvantage on that occasion.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
I do quite like dancing but more the teath grinding, glaring stomping/skanking loon. the nice and sexy dancer of the university I find utterly contemptable.
 

thirdform

Well-known member

In fact the biggest problem today to me is there isn't really much dance music with attitude. Even the hard techno revival is optimised for club use, rather than seriously frazzling those boxes. In that sense club culture has nothing left to prove, it won by expelling all the outsiders.
 

mixed_biscuits

_________________________
I do quite like dancing but more the teath grinding, glaring stomping/skanking loon. the nice and sexy dancer of the university I find utterly contemptable.
Acid techno nights will give you the former with the older demographic thrown in too.
 
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