thirdform

Well-known member
this for instance is already out of date. Young Thug? Travi$ Scott? Playboy Carty It's finished. He's behind the rap commentariat on this. People are going back to the rappedy-rap he was dissing.

It wasn’t Auto-Tune that killed rap, it was the annihilating abstraction — the outright rejection — of the spoken word, what once had been the pulsating heart of hip-hop. It had been the one thread that’d run through every era, every twist and turn from Sugarhill Gang to 2 Live Krew to Rakim through to Wu-Tang, Lil Wayne, Gucci Mane, Waka Flocka Flame… that’s what’s been superseded. That’s the fallen phoenix from which this new unnamed music’s arisen.
 

other_life

bioconfused
that's exactly it. the move from rap to what comes after rap is not a straight arrow from 'human emcee' to 'pitch-wheeling djinnim' but a wave between the two. the latter is receding while the former comes to the fore (transformed)
 

other_life

bioconfused
drill being corralled into this thesis can also very easily have holes poked in it on this point, there's a lot in drill that is not reliant on pitch-correction/other kinds of vocal augmentation but is in continuity with the history of rap -as rap-
Love the stuff about gunk and digitalised sludge. Superb.
+++ this could also dovetail with moanwave being the white lumpen's vocal psychedelia: GUNK is a common descriptor for synthesiser textures in that same kind of music - a shredding-through via hard limiting, cheap tape compression or successive and compressing auto-overdubs of the synthesizer preset
 

thirdform

Well-known member
Young Thug’s “For My People” goes a step further, taking this technique and applying it to a whole percussive patchwork of bickering cowbells, making the track sound like a Salvador Dali melting clock version of Steve Reich’s glockenspiel workout “Drumming Pt. IV”.

Best musicological description from the bart man, and very accurate. Although really the 808 bass drum restricts it, gives it a stiffness it really needs to escape.
 

other_life

bioconfused
the neptunes/producers of that school making beats with no centering and all-compressing bass kick should be an example we look back on and move forward with. there's still a strictly musicological rupture to be made independent of or parallel to ruptures of vocalisation, and it's to definitively break with the 808
 

thirdform

Well-known member
You actually had this with the more harsher ends of 90s rave. LSD is often associated with pastoralism but it's far more intergalactic. Mushrooms are very witchy in this regard. a great concept to hone further.

When taken in conjunction with music, drugs develop their own mystiques and mythologies. Weed is now inseparable from Rastafari and Five-Percent Nation theology in the public imagination because of its association with reggae and rap. Our ideas of MDMA are likewise completely contextualised through rave’s hands in the air ecstatic rapture. In mumble rap, drug consumption becomes an Orpheus-like descent into the underworld; the music sounds like you’re being tormented by all the shades in Hades. Drug use in mumble rap isn’t about meditation or even medication, it’s an act of self-flagellation.


Revealingly:

MISTER_DIA-TRIBE_73 August 1, 2020

referencing The Tomorrow E.P., 12", EP, HANI 009
And you thought you had bad dreams!? . . . .

One thing Simons Energy Flash is unable to ground properly, because I mean his position as part of the intelligentsia won't allow him to, is to truly get into the way that the nutter mentality compells said nutters to seek out deranged sounds. Luke is in one sense right to think of my music as cartoonish, but also in another way its a disservice, because its actually way beyond that, its an excessive recalibration of the nervous system, a recalibration that most clubbers (mature, sexed up, consumerist) shy away from. In this sense I would say that the real innovative drug of rave was not MDMA, but LSD and briefly MDA (snowballs) which approximated effects closer to acids disorientation and dissociation, hallucinations and fracturing of reality. E itself is actually very hippyish unless combined with amphetamines. And in fact you can hear this in the music, dodgy pills made the transition from hardcore to jungle one of the highest points of electronic music. This is where psytrance and drug cultures fail. Harm reduction is great for ones health, but an impediment to musical development.


There's no joy to be found in this music.

 

thirdform

Well-known member
What I like about this book is it's forcing me to think about music completely contrary to it. Like I wish someone wrote this for really harsh Japanese free jazz like Masayuki Takayanagi or noise merchants Mainliner.

To enjoy frag rap is to induce your own electronic epilepsy — to succumb to rhythmic sound seizures. Derealisation, déjà vu and dissociative identity disorder are all effects associated with seizures and they’re all experienced when listening to frag rap too. It’s like sonic REM, but rapid mind movement rather than rapid eye movement. The music puts the listener into a state where their body switches off while your neurons fire chaotically and incoherently.

That chaos and incoherency I associate with this very brutal free jazz which almost expunges the uplifting soulfulness, only leaving the agonising pain of the blues.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
Which probably explains why I don't get that feeling from a lot of mumble rap. It's not nuttercore enough. Musically I want to go into the asylum, or experience the tyranny of the prison industrial complex.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
I like how he calls Belgium a foreign fill. Of course I disagree, but I'm not British. That's why I hear 91-93 hardcore differently to him.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
His vocals are so bizarrely Auto-Tuned on tracks like “Perfect”, “Depend Pan Nobody” and “Nuh Wife” it makes you feel like you’re fucking in the future as sexual magnetism seems to radiate out of Alkaline from some kind of phallic tractor beam.

If only it were so. the production, the placements of instruments are nowhere near sludgey enough, too 90s in many respects.

But damn, I want to hear music like that.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
Music simulates the future. It war-games it. All those sci-fi sounds it produces, all of the vivid and visceral audio imagery it conjures, are premonitions and prophecies of the world that awaits us. You can be a cynic and say this is all bullshit (and you may well be right), but music becomes so much more rewarding if you don’t. So fuck it, have some fun. Suspend your disbelief for a bit and allow these musical delusions to run amok.

Yeah but mate listen to that Eric Ross lp on creel pone, and then tell me there has been such a thing as instrumental progress in a lot of the music you champion, if you extract the voice from it. This is the books blindspot, that it doesn't interrogate its notion of progress. Kill the rockist, kill the future! It's dead and buried, stop chafing away at that foreskin that got snipped off, let it go. We are in the future, it's here, the future is not autotune but music escaping the paradigms of the strictures of the old skool industry. A revolution, but in the mathematical sense. revolutions per nanosecond, faster than your mind can even comprehend. Amulets thrown into an uncealed toomb radioactively corroding everything they encounter. Hooligan plunderphonics now! The bourgeoisie has no more culture to offer, destroy the club and the party, let a festival of the gutters bloom! Dramatise all Stalinist 5 year plans in sonic form, don't ghost your ancestors, drag them from side-to-side, increase their horrified vertigo, smash their skulls, mop up the coagulating ooz that springs up from their eyeballs, chuck their feet in a pit of flames for their adultery, bring them into the future, show them Hiroshima and Nagasaki, extend their shreeks of terror into infinity! Pure acid puritanism, no idols, no joy, no fun, no sedation, just pure anxiety and adrenaline, an electronic current completely enveloping all that it encounters, turning the entire world into its own dominion, closer and closer and closer until there is no you, but you are everything. Launch!

 
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thirdform

Well-known member
the neptunes/producers of that school making beats with no centering and all-compressing bass kick should be an example we look back on and move forward with. there's still a strictly musicological rupture to be made independent of or parallel to ruptures of vocalisation, and it's to definitively break with the 808

Yes. the 808 is too tyranical. Some techno geezers pushed it as far as it could go in the 90s, but we must now lift off into pure hypopolyrhythmic distorted darbuka jihad.

808 wizardry, maybe drill and acid techno could be compatible

 

mvuent

Void Dweller
also not sold on the difference/opposition between 'frag rap' and 'mumble rap' and the coding of that opposition to apollo and dionysus is an -embarrassingly huge- tell. to kids out here that are playing nle choppa and pop smoke on the roku tv's in bodegas and on bluetooth speakers at train stations it's all still trap music. this is someone trying to get ahead on genre coinage and probably none of it will hold for anyone involved in the production of this kind of music or the people its primarily intended for (which is neither me nor barty)
seems to me you're expecting this book to function as some kind of authentic journalistic account of the genres it covers in a way that was simply never intended. i don't think he's saying "all the kids are talking about a new genre they're calling dionysian machine elf rap, you heard it from me first!" he's saying, "hey you, uninvolved bookish nerd who's reading this, here's a distinction i make where i'm listening that you might appreciate as well." in more brilliant than the sun eshun uses all sorts of weird made up terms that no one making the music ever used and that's part of the appeal. i think it's about demonstrating to the uninitiated that the music in question is rich enough to reward deep imaginative engagement.

that said, surely it's bad to privilege this sort of account so much that the actual stories of the people directly involved get obscured. but my hope would be that hearing about this music first in a more fantastical way would make people (again, i'm thinking of the culturally uninvolved nerds like me who might read this book) more curious about the more direct realities that shaped it, not less.
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
this for instance is already out of date. Young Thug? Travi$ Scott? Playboy Carty It's finished. He's behind the rap commentariat on this. People are going back to the rappedy-rap he was dissing.
eh, as you yourself said, futurism has always been imaginary. surely we can agree that the value of the book doesn't rest on his ability to make nostradamus style predictions about the next big thing. "but never underestimate the power of myth, they can be thousand years out of date and still provide great works of beauty and horror." great line imo it applies here.

drill being corralled into this thesis can also very easily have holes poked in it on this point, there's a lot in drill that is not reliant on pitch-correction/other kinds of vocal augmentation but is in continuity with the history of rap -as rap-
tbf he readily admits that. i think the reasoning for its inclusion was at least a little bit “hey since i’m writing a book, here’s another thing i have opinions about” lol.
 
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