questions you are dying to ask but are too scared to b/c of music nerd cred?

philblackpool

gamelanstep
Ha...just looking the place up on Google & this pops up: "Situated in Hackney Wick, Geneva's keeps rocking until dawn, fuelled by the rhythm of the neighbouring A12 bypass. And if you need a break from the dancefloor, why not pop up the road and treat yourself to a handgun?"
 

Bang Diddley

Well-known member
I know nothing about the music BUT I think this is one of the greatest songs ever recorded:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9h5_v1NkFM

Sounds remarkably similar to "Rubber Biscuit" by The Chips (which I can't find a copy of - apart from the one I own HA!)

Not sure if it would have been played so much by the Windrush peeps due to accessibility issues. Would native-born Jamaicans have really sought out this music? I get the impression doo-wop never really took of in this country in the way it did in the States. I may be wrong though. I can see more similarities with the kind of New Orleans boogie-woogie R&B than with doo-wop.. Hit me up with some track titles, please.

Nice tune. Prob not thinking about about it. Well not DooWop but yep id agree the R&B would have been more of an influence in early JA music. Likewise dont know about Doowop so cant help with any titles.
 

DigitalDjigit

Honky Tonk Woman
what actually takes place during the mastering process?

The mixed down track is passed through an equalizer and a compressor. Basically the sound is cleaned up a bit and made punchier and the loudness level is set. This is more important when the track is to be recorded on vinyl because of the limitations/parameters of the vinyl medium.
 

domitian

uhhh huh
The mixed down track is passed through an equalizer and a compressor. Basically the sound is cleaned up a bit and made punchier and the loudness level is set. This is more important when the track is to be recorded on vinyl because of the limitations/parameters of the vinyl medium.

very broadly, mastering is the finishing touch of the recording process.
 

michael

Bring out the vacuum
The mixed down track is passed through an equalizer and a compressor. Basically the sound is cleaned up a bit and made punchier and the loudness level is set. This is more important when the track is to be recorded on vinyl because of the limitations/parameters of the vinyl medium.

Mastering of an album would also involve checking this kind of thing across the course of the album as well - the relative perceived loudness / brightness / etc. from track to track as well as within each track.

Vinyl mastering sounds more complicated than just tidying up levels, because you have to strip out huge amounts of bass and crank the treble. Again, this relates to getting the most out of the medium. On playback this is reversed to get the desired sound. Wikipedia article on the topic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIAA_equalization

Plus it's more important to check stereo phase wonkiness in bass frequencies etc. to avoid skipping needles, etc. Although mastering for other formats people will potentially sum chunks below certain frequencies to mono anyway, given our brains don't get worse and worse at perceiving stereo below a certain pitch, etc.
 

massrock

Well-known member
Deep Medi Vol 1 Tracklisting:

01. Kromestar - Kalawanji
02. Kromestar - Surgery
03. Hijak - Timewarp Babylon
04. Hijak - Dally
05. Coki - All Of A Sudden
06. Loefah - Disko Rekah
07. Mala - Changes
08. Mala - Forgive
09. Goth-Trad - Cut End
10. Goth-Trad - Flags
 

Tentative Andy

I'm in the Meal Deal
Lack of dubstep-nerd cred question:

LD and LV - beyond the names, is there anything more to there relationship, i.e. familial, professional, etc? I know they've both had stuff on Hyperdub but does it go any deeper than that? I just seems odd for 2 people to have such similar pseudonyms.
 

Tentative Andy

I'm in the Meal Deal
Cheers.
Looking back, I probably phrased that question in the most over-elaborate way possible. Clearly out of posting practice. :confused: :eek:
 

Slothrop

Tight but Polite
Questions arising from University of Dub:
1) What exactly is 'steppers' as in 'roots, dub and steppers'?
2) Why do Aba Shanti-I have all their equipment at head height?
 

john eden

male pale and stale
steppers is basically four to the floor stuff these days, I think.

head height - basically follows on from shaka I guess - I've always assumed it is so the line of sight for putting the needle on the tune is as short as possible or something.

How was Fatman, though? curious about that as they are not known for playing uk dub stuff...
 

michael

Bring out the vacuum
Yeah, steppers is usually used when describing, say, a track that feels like 70bpm and then the 4 to the floor kick comes in double-time so it's a bit like 140bpm house vibes doof doof doof doof.
 

Bang Diddley

Well-known member
steppers is basically four to the floor stuff these days, I think.

head height - basically follows on from shaka I guess - I've always assumed it is so the line of sight for putting the needle on the tune is as short as possible or something.

How was Fatman, though? curious about that as they are not known for playing uk dub stuff...

Ive been told the head height thing is also to help to the the id of the record a secret.
 
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