wonderful graffiti

sufi

lala
!!free tox11!!

tox in the shit
I should like to defend Daniel Halpin (or "Tox") against the charges of certain establishment figures – police, popular artists, and prosecutors – that his work amounts to nothing more than trivial but pervasive vandalism, lacking in skill or merit (Tox tagger faces prison, 8 June).

I have enjoyed Mr Halpin's work since I started to travel to London extensively and would see "TOX 06" emblazoned on mile after mile of train carriages, railway sidings, bridges and buildings. Its ubiquity, regularity and apparent pointlessness is what makes the work a powerful critique of the monotony and triviality of the many signs and notices put up by the state which bear instructions, prohibitions and statements of the obvious.

When I walk down a street and see in the space of half a mile 20 metal plaques bearing all manner of petty injunctions – "No drinking in this area"; "No parking on matchdays 6.30pm–8.30pm"; "Dogs to be kept on leads in the park" – I feel, to borrow vocabulary from Detective Constable Livings, the state has committed a selfish vandalism which scars the environment and contributes to a sense of oppression, anxiety and lack of personal agency.

As artist Ben Flynn says, Mr Halpin's work is indeed "incredibly basic" and lacking in "style". I think that's the point.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/jun/07/tox-graffiti-artist-criminal-damage
eine twists the knife
 

computer_rock

Well-known member
tox in the shit

eine twists the knife

eine was called as a defence witness in order to support the assertion that tox's tag can be easily imitated.

predictably the people in the comments section have not only got the wrong end of the stick, but also have no fucking idea what they are talking about. saying eine is a 'street artist' and not a writer or that he only paints shutters is so off the mark it's unreal... the guy has been up in london for about 20 years - tags, throwups, pieces, trains, walls the lot.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I don't mind seeing Tox's tag, it's just an integral part of the London environment. In any case, making a fuss about something like that in London is like complaining that the weather's often a bit grey and the tube is shit at weekends.
 

luka

Well-known member
eine swtiched to being a 'street artist' ten yeas ago. almost all london writers are in thir mid to late thirties come from places like leighton buzzard and are as middle class as radio 4. i preferred the early 90s. dds pfb and rcs. no one trying to be an 'artist'. much more destruction.
 

Dr Awesome

Techsteppin'
Dunno how.... if it's real.

tumblr_ll4toczJiC1qbgpnko1_500.jpg
 

benjybars

village elder.
someone off holloway rd has graffed up a hedge.. just an everyday domestic hedge with a nice big black and chrome tag!

i've lived in london all my life and never seen that before.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
someone off holloway rd has graffed up a hedge.. just an everyday domestic hedge with a nice big black and chrome tag!

i've lived in london all my life and never seen that before.

Ha, when I lived in Geneva a few years ago there was a fair amount of grafitti around by people who were clearly trying to imitate stuff they'd seen elsewhere. I also saw a tagged hedge, which to me indicated a failure to grasp the basic concept of tagging (leaving a semi-permanent signature on a building or public vehicle).
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Ha, great. Wish I'd taken a photo of my Swiss hedge-tagger now.

There's actually a tag I know from London that I saw in Geneva, and another I recognised in Barcelona. Funny to think there are these A-list international taggers flying from city to city, leaving their sign wherever they go.
 

luka

Well-known member
There's actually a tag I know from London that I saw in Geneva, and another I recognised in Barcelona. Funny to think there are these A-list international taggers flying from city to city, leaving their sign wherever they go.

this was fairly common even in the pre-internet days as many writers had an international profile due to the influence of magazines like fat cap and graphotism and events like fulhams unity jam which always had international artists.
 
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