baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
The Hours of the Day is interesting, in the banal serial killer mini-genre.

Fassbinder's Satan's Brew is sort of brilliantly funny, but gets dull when you realise that (utterly) mad characters don't give you much to hold on to/care about in a film.
 

yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
I recently found out there's a new Gus van Sant movie, I wonder how it managed to get passed my radar because he is one of my favourite directors. So in generally, watch his oeuvre, he hasn't really made one bad movie but specifically go and see Elephant and Gerry. The latter is one of my all-time favourites. You only need to get past the first 20/30 minutes and once you finish you'll be experiencing dehydration and fata morgana's yourself. I saw his latest movie, Restless, two weeks ago. It's quite okay, reminded me very much of the kind of drama's the Japanese are so good in. The quiet and quirky ones. There's a Japanese character in the movie as well, I wonder if it's a direct reference.
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
I quite enjoyed ''The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo'' (Fincher version). I mean, I didn't really see the point of it all, but it was very taught and slick... The narrative thrust of it is almost the point, as far as I can tell - I can see why Fincher is so drawn to detective stories, his filmaking is so procedural (this is probably a cliche by now but). The opening credits were 'cool' but it was like the boat-race scene in ''The Social Network'' for me. As if he's just showing off, betraying his origins in adverts/music videos. Which he's always doing, in a sense: flexing his directorial muscles.

Over christmas I also saw ''Arthur Christmas'' at the cinema and thought it was wonderful (and watched ''Wallace and Gromit and The Curse of the Were-Rabbit'' on iPlayer today with a similar reaction).
 

grizzleb

Well-known member
The Hours of the Day is interesting, in the banal serial killer mini-genre.

Fassbinder's Satan's Brew is sort of brilliantly funny, but gets dull when you realise that (utterly) mad characters don't give you much to hold on to/care about in a film.
On this note, I started watching Melancholia with some mates and we ended up sacking it around the 40 minute mark. The utter reprehensibility of all the characters, indeed the complete uneasiness that enveloped the piece was (whilst impressively well maintained) making it quite difficult to give half of a fuck what happened to them. I might watch it on my own to find out how it progressed. I'd imagine it could be decent in the cinema too, but it was quite a difficult watch with very little to draw you in.
 

zhao

there are no accidents
not an unreserved recommendation, but the first Congolese film in 25 years, Viva Riva, was pretty good. Pulp Fiction on crack with a touch of Bollywood (general cheesiness, not actual choreographed song/dance), the violence much more brutal and casual than anything in the west... but if you didn't like City of God it's not for you.
 

pork

Wild Swine
Valhalla Rising, thanks to recommendations upthread. Agurire meats Stalker with a caustic drone soundtrack. Absolutely loved it. Pusher next!
 

bruno

est malade
hitchcock's north by northwest. eva marie saint also acts in kazan's on the waterfront, a different beast, also highly recommended.
 

bruno

est malade
Battle of Algiers
this is excellent, and you are right that this kind of filmmaking is missing, but i don't think it was ever common. it was financed by the government of algeria (an anomaly) and i believe used non-professional actors, which explains why it feels is so real, in particular the incredibly emotive final uprising.

some time ago i saw the day of the jackal, it connected nicely (on purpose?) with battle in that the people out to kill de gaulle are doing so for his granting independence to algeria, and the man that is the general in pontecorvo's film (jean martin) is tortured by french intelligence. i recommend this and left a link to it in the youtube films thread.
 

zhao

there are no accidents
good call.

you have seen it? seems like Viva Riva was a big deal in Africa or at least Congo, but not very well distributed in the west at all. i watched it with some Congolese friends on a burnt DVD from download (which refused to play in proper aspect ratio).

but yeah. little things stick in the mind, like pimped out gangsters dressed to the nines bent over fiercely munching on chicken with both hands, or sexy dancing girl walking into the bushes to pee - standing up. oh and of course all this cunning and treachery and betrayal and violence and death -- for a truck load of petroleum.
 
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zhao

there are no accidents
the day of the jackal

yes this name rings loud in my mind as i think it was suggested to me by trusted sources before, but i managed to forget until now, so thanks!

not enough films use non-actors -- of course my favorite contemporary director, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, always uses them (exclusively?) anyone catch his latest Uncle Boomee? it was pretty great as all of his films are, but i'm sad to say the day i finally saw it in the cinema i happened to be so utterly exhausted i fell asleep half way through... :(:eek::confused:

films like these* which use non-actors to such amazing naturalistic and un-self conscious effect, their raw and in-the-flesh "performances" so real as not even seeming like performances at all (perhaps they really are not), and the viewer is made to feel like someone standing right there in the scene, observing from first person perspective or even participating in it ---- films like these simply pull the rug out from under bullshit celebrity famous actors culture. not that this is the case all the time with every kind of film making, as non-actors probably can't pull off, say, Matrix, but very often some random person pulled off the street with zero experience in front of the camera does it much better than george clooney or julia roberts.

* the best example ever of course probably Dreyer's Passion of Joan of Arc
 
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slowtrain

Well-known member
yes this name rings loud in my mind as i think it was suggested to me by trusted sources before, but i managed to forget until now, so thanks!

not enough films use non-actors -- of course my favorite contemporary director, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, always uses them (exclusively?) anyone catch his latest Uncle Boomee? it was pretty great as all of his films are, but i'm sad to say the day i finally saw it in the cinema i happened to be so utterly exhausted i fell asleep half way through... :(:eek::confused:

films like these* which use non-actors to such amazing naturalistic and un-self conscious effect, their raw and in-the-flesh "performances" so real as not even seeming like performances at all (perhaps they really are not), and the viewer is made to feel like someone standing right there in the scene, observing from first person perspective or even participating in it ---- films like these simply pull the rug out from under bullshit celebrity famous actors culture. not that this is the case all the time with every kind of film making, as non-actors probably can't pull off, say, Matrix, but very often some random person pulled off the street with zero experience in front of the camera does it much better than george clooney or julia roberts.

* the best example ever of course probably Dreyer's Passion of Joan of Arc


Yes, I totally agree with this.

I really want to want some of his films, but can't manage to find them anywhere....
 

bruno

est malade
yes this name rings loud in my mind as i think it was suggested to me by trusted sources before, but i managed to forget until now, so thanks!

not enough films use non-actors -- of course my favorite contemporary director, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, always uses them (exclusively?) anyone catch his latest Uncle Boomee? it was pretty great as all of his films are, but i'm sad to say the day i finally saw it in the cinema i happened to be so utterly exhausted i fell asleep half way through... :(:eek::confused:

films like these* which use non-actors to such amazing naturalistic and un-self conscious effect, their raw and in-the-flesh "performances" so real as not even seeming like performances at all (perhaps they really are not), and the viewer is made to feel like someone standing right there in the scene, observing from first person perspective or even participating in it ---- films like these simply pull the rug out from under bullshit celebrity famous actors culture. not that this is the case all the time with every kind of film making, as non-actors probably can't pull off, say, Matrix, but very often some random person pulled off the street with zero experience in front of the camera does it much better than george clooney or julia roberts.

* the best example ever of course probably Dreyer's Passion of Joan of Arc
thai filmmaker, now there's something interesting. i'll see what i can find, thank you.

i like your idea of non-actors adding a dimension of immersion. the thing with the battle of algiers is that, although i now know all this trivia about the film, at the time i did not, and my immediate thought was that the structure of it (swelling, demolishing, resurgence) and the performance of jean martin (reason, order) were as important as the parts of the algerian actors (reason, feeling, chaos), it was a narrative of (political, moral) inevitability.

one detail in the ending that is more important in my view than the feeling of reality of the scene is a purely symbolic one, the faces of the dead revolutionaries (if i remember correctly) that unify the struggle in time and give meaning to the present, it's a very powerful finale.

on the subject of acted/non-acted, i can think of one other film that affected me like this but for very different reasons, and that is an intimate film with professional actors, la dentellière. we identify with the characters not because they are believable, but because their 'arc of life' mirrors our own. some characters i remember the most are weirdly not even directed actors, the night watchman in darwin's nightmare comes to mind. i can see his grin and melancholy eyes from time to time.

incidentally, now that you mention clooney, i think he is a kick-ass actor, and thought syriana was pretty decent for an american political thriller (within the confines of 'the system').
 

rubberdingyrapids

Well-known member
the artist is actually good. in places a little too pastichey but its very touching so it sort of doesnt matter. its easy to love. it is obv oscar-bait like you always get around this time of year but its still just lovely and delightful (without those words ringing kings speech-style alarm bells).

i like clooney. he could be a bit less smug looking at times, but for a big hollywood a lister, he at least tries to do weightier films. the ending was a bit soft but i really liked michael clayton.
 
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IdleRich

IdleRich
Just watched Sleeping Beauty the recentish Australian film about a woman who is paid to drug herself unconscious and subject her body to the tender mercies of overaged sex perverts (who are allowed to do anything except penetrate her). I guess this could have gone in the erotic film thread - except it's not at all erotic (except for maybe when she is being choked by a invasive medical procedure that she undergoes in one of her many attempts to raise money - but that's probably just me). A sumptuously cold and alienating film about alienation with lots of interesting ideas and many unresolved points. I'd recommend it highly (and if enough people have seen it I think it's worth its own thread).

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1588398/reviews

It would make a great double-bill with the Japanese film The Bedroom (also known as Unfaithful Wife: Shameful Torture) which shares a very similar premise.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105392/
 

Tony Flavourmore

Well-known member
you have seen it? seems like Viva Riva was a big deal in Africa or at least Congo, but not very well distributed in the west at all. i watched it with some Congolese friends on a burnt DVD from download (which refused to play in proper aspect ratio).

but yeah. little things stick in the mind, like pimped out gangsters dressed to the nines bent over fiercely munching on chicken with both hands, or sexy dancing girl walking into the bushes to pee - standing up. oh and of course all this cunning and treachery and betrayal and violence and death -- for a truck load of petroleum.


yeah I've seen it. I'd never heard about till you mentioned it. It does seem as if it hasn't been promoted at all in the west. From the credits, which I vaguely remember, seems like the whole thing was made by some french crew. The narrative and editing are certainly very western.

Yeah, great story telling I wouldn't be surprised if it was based on actual events. Maybe in the near future energy itself will be a form of currency, this film highlights the possibility of that. That lesbian scene with the commander-woman was definitely a taboo kind event you wouldn't see in 'usual' African films.


You seen Jerusalema? The South African rags-to-riches one?
 

zhao

there are no accidents
The narrative and editing are certainly very western.

You seen Jerusalema? The South African rags-to-riches one?

anyone seen many Nollywood films? would be interesting but again the problem of access.

and then there is that Kenyan sci fi flick where future people living in underground green houses or something, shouldn't it be out by now?

no haven not seen Jerusalema, but it keeps winking at me when pass by. so i should see it?
 

slim jenkins

El Hombre Invisible
The Artist
Believe the hype.
Feel good factor: 10
& yes, the dog
& the dream sequence.
Too 'mainstream' for you?
Then f*ck off. :D
 

Tony Flavourmore

Well-known member
anyone seen many Nollywood films? would be interesting but again the problem of access.

and then there is that Kenyan sci fi flick where future people living in underground green houses or something, shouldn't it be out by now?

no haven not seen Jerusalema, but it keeps winking at me when pass by. so i should see it?

worth a watch if you're interested in south african thuglife. kenyan sci-fi eh? name?
can anyone recommend some other good african films? preferably made by africans, and with 'unconventional' techniques.
 
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