Compression

hint

party record with a siren
DigitalDjigit said:
Thank god for compression. It rescued us from rickety drum sounds in techno. Whatever you may say about hard loopy techno since '98 or so, the impact of it is so physical, it just grabs you by the balls.
The kind of compression being discussed here is a mastering issue, not a production issue.

You could push those finished rickety drum techno records through a brickwall limiter set to the "Christina Aguilera Single" preset and they would still have rickety drums. They'd just be easier to pick out on your car stereo as you drive at 70mph, or on your radio's 3" mono speaker as you do the washing up.

As Slothrop pointed out... no-one's is undermining the usefulness of compression during production either as a tool or even as an effect when "abused".
 

DigitalDjigit

Honky Tonk Woman
Yeah..but the topic is called Compression I was just going off on a little tangent. I wasn't responding to the article in any way. We've heard it all a million times before and no one disagrees with it.

What I got from the piece is that most people are stupid, don't care for music and use it to shut off the outside world and their thinking. Together with news that X-Men grossed some ridiculous amount of money despite being a really terrible movie (according to those who liked the first two even) it just reinforced my loss of faith in humanity.
 
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SIZZLE

gasoline for haters
This discussion reminded me of a tune I recently heard via Rupture's blog, Ichso by Ricardo Villalobos. An interesting tune, listened for the first time the other day, it starts with a nice slippery rhythm and sound-ish beat and some drifting melodies, could be a backwards guitar, or anything. This goes on for about five minutes before, basically without warning, he drops in a much louder, techno kick and bass. Speaking of volume knobs I had to rush quickly to mine to turn it down because I had it up quite loud already. I found the use of this kind of a dynamic shift pretty shocking in a 'club' record and it did get me thinking about the potential and power there. Since we undisputably are in a 'squash limiting' era most people, like me are really not expecting major dynamic shifts in their music, so when you use one it's startlingly powerful. It also has the added tricky effect of, by starting quiet, getting people to turn up their amps, gains, what have you, as I did, before you hit them with some major loudness. As a producer, especially one who works with 'big system music' I see a pretty interesting opportunity here to differentiate oneself from the pack by re-incorporating strong dynamic shifts into tunes.
 

mms

sometimes
SIZZLE said:
This discussion reminded me of a tune I recently heard via Rupture's blog, Ichso by Ricardo Villalobos. An interesting tune, listened for the first time the other day, it starts with a nice slippery rhythm and sound-ish beat and some drifting melodies, could be a backwards guitar, or anything. This goes on for about five minutes before, basically without warning, he drops in a much louder, techno kick and bass. Speaking of volume knobs I had to rush quickly to mine to turn it down because I had it up quite loud already. I found the use of this kind of a dynamic shift pretty shocking in a 'club' record and it did get me thinking about the potential and power there. Since we undisputably are in a 'squash limiting' era most people, like me are really not expecting major dynamic shifts in their music, so when you use one it's startlingly powerful. It also has the added tricky effect of, by starting quiet, getting people to turn up their amps, gains, what have you, as I did, before you hit them with some major loudness. As a producer, especially one who works with 'big system music' I see a pretty interesting opportunity here to differentiate oneself from the pack by re-incorporating strong dynamic shifts into tunes.

mark stewart used this trick on an album, the whole tyhing gets so much louder half way thru
very naughty
 
YOINK! I'll think I'll steal that....

SIZZLE said:
This discussion reminded me of a tune I recently heard via Rupture's blog, Ichso by Ricardo Villalobos. An interesting tune, listened for the first time the other day, it starts with a nice slippery rhythm and sound-ish beat and some drifting melodies, could be a backwards guitar, or anything. This goes on for about five minutes before, basically without warning, he drops in a much louder, techno kick and bass. Speaking of volume knobs I had to rush quickly to mine to turn it down because I had it up quite loud already. I found the use of this kind of a dynamic shift pretty shocking in a 'club' record and it did get me thinking about the potential and power there. Since we undisputably are in a 'squash limiting' era most people, like me are really not expecting major dynamic shifts in their music, so when you use one it's startlingly powerful. It also has the added tricky effect of, by starting quiet, getting people to turn up their amps, gains, what have you, as I did, before you hit them with some major loudness. As a producer, especially one who works with 'big system music' I see a pretty interesting opportunity here to differentiate oneself from the pack by re-incorporating strong dynamic shifts into tunes.

only joking!
 

SIZZLE

gasoline for haters
steal away, the idea of using dynamics in music is definitely not one I invented, it only seems original now because nobody is using it.

To draw for the slightly rinsed evolution analogy the total dominance of squash compression is like a form of inbreeding, everyone gets more and more similar and it opens up an opportunity for one virus to come along and wipe everyone out. I'd be pretty happy to see a dynamics fad get started, especially in club music.
 

Whoa-B

Brüt Force Family
SIZZLE said:
I'd be pretty happy to see a dynamics fad get started, especially in club music.
The Whisper Song springs to mind, but then again this is more like a creative use of the requisite club banger compression.
 

minikomi

pu1.pu2.wav.noi
when i saw scientist play last month the most powerful dub he made was a track which basically had a 10 minute breakdown which was about half the volume of what he had been playing up to that point.. a lovely 4 4 kick snaking in and out of focus and almost no bass, just echoes of what had been there for the first minute or so of the track...
it had been great up until that point, but this was something else!
 

DJ PIMP

Well-known member
SIZZLE said:
As a producer, especially one who works with 'big system music' I see a pretty interesting opportunity here to differentiate oneself from the pack by re-incorporating strong dynamic shifts into tunes.
This is part of the build-drop structure in lots of tracks in dnb etc. Build up, the beat drops away, light swishy ambient noise... BOOOM into the main bass/beat. Entirely formulaic but effective enough I guess at giving a little bit of contrast in the dynamics.

I still find it really effective when people build up a beat that sounds fat, and then drop a layer of even fatter louder drums on top.
 

mpc

wasteman
DigitalDjigit said:
Thank god for compression. It rescued us from rickety drum sounds in techno. Whatever you may say about hard loopy techno since '98 or so, the impact of it is so physical, it just grabs you by the balls.
yeah, thanks for that. ;)
 

tox

Factory Girl
this is kind of the thing i try not to read, so as not to squeeze every last drop of fun out of listening to music. once you've read it, its hard not to notice and you can't go back.

on the other hand i do have the stereo system in this picture.

i hope that doesn't make me a horribly patronizing anal audiophile (oh wait, it can't can it. for that i would have to spend at least thousands on my music equipment.)
 
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