The cars you drive

originaldrum

from start till done
What kind of car do you drive?

Is it as interesting as your musical taste?

Please contribute a picture of your wheels.

Here is mine:
 

craner

Beast of Burden
Silver Citroen C3 with the shittest, most annoying CD player of all time, but I otherwise love my car.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
Cars are a complete fucking catastrophe in almost every sense. Wont even consider commuting in one these days and thats 20 miles a day in some pretty shitty weather.

Had to buy a new one before xmas as our 15 year old Yaris clapped out and was disgusted at myself. Electric next once the 40kw+ models reach the 2nd hand market at reasonable prices.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
I also resist the characterisation of mutual contempt. I drive and try and have a decent regard for cyclists & pedestrians when in the car, but am far less tolerable of drivers when cycling for good reason - they are generally reckless and can kill me. The psychology of driving is uniquely toxic amongst road users.
 

sufi

lala
Rachel Cusk said:
These days, I often witness the sight of a man or woman on a bicycle with a child and heavy shopping strapped to the back, pedaling furiously through the rain while being overtaken by a stream of cars, or drawn up at a traffic light beside a large clean car with another parent and child sitting calmly inside. The difference between the two is striking without being immediately comprehensible. They might almost be said to represent a mutual criticism; alternatively, they could be seen as demonstrating fundamentally different attitudes to children. If it is true that the cycling parent’s behavior signifies at least the willingness to make greater efforts on behalf of his or her child, from the outside it can look like the reverse. The driver could even view the cyclist as irresponsible, for failing to adequately protect his or her child from the dangers of the driver’s own vehicle.
Mutual contempt, but not symmetrical

I think there's even deeper conflicts in terms of driver safety being inversely proportional to safety of everyone else, and even how the aircon in the car filters out its own muck
 

Leo

Active member
don't own one. would sometimes be nice to have but don't need one, and don't miss the expense of fuel, insurance, parking, maintenance, etc.

even less need since the advent of Lyft/uber, for short trips inconvenient to mass transit.
 

martin

----
As Sham 69 once put it, I don't need no flash car to take me around...I can get the bus to the other side of town! I've always been lucky enough to live within spitting distance of a tube station, so never bothered to learn to drive.

My mum had a green Ford Cortina which was her pride and joy. My dad had a red Datsun Cherry: kids at school thought this was hilarious and would regularly rip the piss out of me for being related to someone who drove a 'paki car' or 'Southall special'. Worse, the old man eventually traded it in for a cream Lada Samara and I had to start walking everywhere.

Sometimes I think it would be good to have a car, just in case I ever want to go somewhere weird and exotic like Huddersfield or Wales without paying a fortune and suffering arse-ache on the train. Or having a Toyota Supra 28i Mk I and driving around the Pennines, blasting out 52nd Street at full whack.
 
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Leo

Active member
I don't hate cars, just don't need one. enjoy driving when on vacation, except when in the uk where you all do everything backwards.
 

martin

----
I don't hate cars, just don't need one. enjoy driving when on vacation, except when in the uk where you all do everything backwards.
The other great advantage of cars, as STN will attest, is that you can throw things at pedestrians from them.
 

sufi

lala
My mum had a green Ford Cortina which was her pride and joy. My dad had a red Datsun Cherry: kids at school thought this was hilarious and would regularly rip the piss out of me for being related to someone who drove a 'paki car' or 'Southall special'. Worse, the old man eventually traded it in for a cream Lada Samara and I had to start walking everywhere.
My mum had a beige citroen diane, aka "the sewing machine" due to the high pitched whine of the motor.
One day we thought someone had pinched it, but no chance, the brakes had failed in the night and it had gone to meet destiny at the bottom of the hill
 

yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
i can’t drive so well. i find it difficult to pay attention to so many things simultaneously. it makes me stressed and i block. my father consequently had a volkswagen golf 1, 2 and 3 i think. i always liked that car. is it interesting to observe cars like those losing their distinct shapes with each new model? with sharp edges being smoothed out, going from a rather cubicle car to something round and soft? as did the television, with it’s ever more panoramic dimensions. as did the internet, and it’s buttons to click on? as did youth cultures? as did almost everything? or is that just nostalgia?

if i had a car and would be good at driving it, i would take it on long journeys. passing many boarders, taking a ferry every now and then. i'd take the music from this thread with me: http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=4009
 

Leo

Active member
if i had a car and would be good at driving it, i would take it on long journeys. passing many boarders, taking a ferry every now and then. i'd take the music from this thread with me: http://www.dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=4009
I always imagined that was a bit of an American dream but I guess it's universal: car culture, the open road, setting off to drive "cross country" with windows rolled down and music cranked up, passing through every backwater town, Route 66. then you could collect all your adventures and write a book, "on the road".
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I'd prefer not to have to drive - I'm quite jealous of my girlfriend, who can walk to work and has the option of buses when it's pissing down - but the only alternative for me to get to work would be a train/bus combo that takes twice as long and costs twice as much. Plus it's great if you want to get rid of bulky waste from home, do a decent-sized shopping trip in one go or travel any substantial distance without using our outrageously expensive and often horribly overcrowded trains.

Actually the biggest downer of driving is the INTERMINABLE FUCKING ROADWORKS everywhere you go. My work commute has been disrupted for about a year now, with no end in sight, by some imbecilic 'road widening' scheme on a road that as far as I can remember was as wide as it needed to be already. The work site is often empty, with barely a dozen men working on a stretch of road a couple of hundred metres long on a good day, and hardly looks any different from one month to the next. The whole scheme appears to be managed by Franz Kafka and the Marquis de Sade. I honestly reckon the head of a local roadworks firm has got some juicy dirt on a councillor. It's the only possible explanation.
 
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yyaldrin

in je ogen waait de wind
At the heart of In a Paraventral Scale is “BMW Shuanghuan X5,” a mesmerizing track featuring the sounds of two doppler-shifting BMW engines that are eventually buried under the weight of Gamble’s mechanical synthesis. As the piece progresses, a lush string section mimics the sound of the engines until the two are nearly indistinguishable. Named after a Chinese car replication company, “Shuanghuan” is more than a clever use of texture—according to Gamble, who is the son of a mechanic, it’s a crucial symbol of the project.

“Cars are symbolic of late capitalism… because a car can relate to Fordism, mass production, the idea of ‘a car for everyone,'” he says. “They can be functional; they can be made to appear masculine or feminine, made to represent nationhood. They’re commodities that are close to environmental change, land grabs, and taxation. Cars fit into the idea of an object of desire that’s always spinning around in front of you, and [are] always being advertised to us.”
https://daily.bandcamp.com/2019/01/28/lee-gamble-interview-2/
 
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