Cooking tips and wonderful flavour combinations

mos dan

fact music
And I wouldn't even let a broad bean in my house up until the point I'd tasted it. Our parents, our schools, they lied to us. Broad beans are nice.
wow. i was totally believing my school on this one. but okay, i'll give that recipe a go. just a tin of broad beans? fresh ones?

this lunchtime a very simple bacon, cream cheese and fresh basil sarnie on brown sliced went down very well, thank you.
 

mistersloane

heavy heavy monster sound
wow. i was totally believing my school on this one. but okay, i'll give that recipe a go. just a tin of broad beans? fresh ones?

this lunchtime a very simple bacon, cream cheese and fresh basil sarnie on brown sliced went down very well, thank you.
I'd stick with fresh ones for the first attempt - I never tried it with tinned ones and don't wanna recommend it in case they turn out....*shudders*. I'll type out the recipe in a minute.

Bacon n cream cheese, mmm.....

Whoever was asking about fresh curry leaves as well? I can't find em anywhere, nowhere in Chinatown anyway.
 

mistersloane

heavy heavy monster sound
20g (3/4oz) butter
I onion, chopped
180g serrano ham, roughly chopped, or you can use prosciutto, thickly sliced, get a pink soft one not the dry salty one
2 garlic cloves, crushed
500g (1lb) broad beans, fresh (or frozen it says here)
1/2 cup (125ml) dry white wine
3/4 cup (185ml) chicken stock

Melt butter and add onion, ham and garlic, cook medium heat 5 mins.

Add broad beans and wine and cook over high heat until reduced by half.

Add stock, reduce heat, cover and cook for 10 mins, then uncover and cook for another 10 mins.

Sorted.

I really like it cold rather than hot but either way it's yum.
 

Now then…

New member
sweetcorn with mint
leeks deglazed with Cinzano
chicken stuffed with date & ricotta
stews with tomato & coconut
goats cheese, orange & chicory
celery & peanut butter
 

Sick Boy

All about pride and egos
Now then…;166267 said:
stews with tomato & coconut
Curries with tomato and coconut too.
If you make your Korma with coconut milk, try using creamed coconut. It comes in sticky white bricks and brings the dish to the threshold of cocopotency.
 

petergunn

plywood violin
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/28/dining/28bacon.html

depending on ones perspective, this could be either disgusting or pure nirvana...
this reminds me of recipes you find in cookbooks in the 50's and early 60's... like a hotdog wrapped in hamburger meat then grilled... i have one that is seriously just endless ways to combine baloney, hotdogs, ground beef, and bacon... the colon cancer cookbook...

it's a reminder to the times when people could not afford to eat normal meat every day...
 

nochexxx

harco pronting
Does anyone have any good ideas of what to do with miso concentrate, other than just making miso soup with it? Which is great, of course, but I feel I'm not exploiting it to its full potential.
rubbing it over fish and then baking it is nice.
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
Some more thoughts:

Tomato and dill (with lentils and vinaigrette for a great, easy salad - this one is half-inched from Moro);
Aubergine and walnut (a classic from possibly the greatest cuisine in the entire world - Georgian, of course!).
 

mos dan

fact music
you too are making me feel ill. cant stomach those fruity sweet and savory combos.
yeah my sweet tooth has dwindled from 'minor' to non-existent in recent years, to the point that apricots/prunes/raisins/whatever else in savoury dishes i now find really off-putting.
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
yeah my sweet tooth has dwindled from 'minor' to non-existent in recent years, to the point that apricots/prunes/raisins/whatever else in savoury dishes i now find really off-putting.
Sultanas and/or bananas in a meat curry...surely the very depths of '70s cod-sophisticated mingingness? :mad:
 

nochexxx

harco pronting
so my humble servant returned from the outer reaches of stoke newington with sumac in hand. any advice gratefully received, i will report back later after a few gourmet experiments.
 

mos dan

fact music
20g (3/4oz) butter
I onion, chopped
180g serrano ham, roughly chopped, or you can use prosciutto, thickly sliced, get a pink soft one not the dry salty one
2 garlic cloves, crushed
500g (1lb) broad beans, fresh (or frozen it says here)
1/2 cup (125ml) dry white wine
3/4 cup (185ml) chicken stock

Melt butter and add onion, ham and garlic, cook medium heat 5 mins.

Add broad beans and wine and cook over high heat until reduced by half.

Add stock, reduce heat, cover and cook for 10 mins, then uncover and cook for another 10 mins.

Sorted.

I really like it cold rather than hot but either way it's yum.
btw thanks for this! def gonna try it out - just need to gather the ingredients. the problem with me and serrano ham is i actually can't stop myself from eating it. it's my one desert island food tbh. the point being that if i allow myself the luxury of buying any it rarely lasts. i'm not sure i could even bear to cook with it unless it was a really gnarly knuckle either. but prosciutto, yes, i might be able to bear to put that in a pan.

so my humble servant returned from the outer reaches of stoke newington with sumac in hand. any advice gratefully received, i will report back later after a few gourmet experiments.
on top of cheese on toast (with black pepper too).. um, on, in, or around most kinds of meat.. i put it on a pork chop the other day, that kinda worked.. lamb is its most common pairing, being turkish - i think in turkey (and some dalston/hackney restaurants actually) they have it on counters or tables, like you would a bowl of parmesan, for sprinkling on top of your kebab (or whatever). on scrambled eggs.. i have a sneaking suspicion that it might work with, on or in almost anything.. let's find out!
 

nochexxx

harco pronting
on top of cheese on toast (with black pepper too).. um, on, in, or around most kinds of meat.. i put it on a pork chop the other day, that kinda worked.. lamb is its most common pairing, being turkish - i think in turkey (and some dalston/hackney restaurants actually) they have it on counters or tables, like you would a bowl of parmesan, for sprinkling on top of your kebab (or whatever). on scrambled eggs.. i have a sneaking suspicion that it might work with, on or in almost anything.. let's find out!
yeah the first thing i tried it with was cheese on toast. no brainer!

i then made a bowl of warm pasta the other day with prosciutto / veg and a light olive oil dressing. sumac mixed through!

i still don't really get what it is though.
 
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