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Thread: Dematerialisation.

  1. #856
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Barthy talks about this. Info-packets shrinking. Condensed into blips... .. ... .. . .. .. ..... . ...
    my schtick is that twitter, snapchat, vine, et al. have rewired our collective cognition to crave rapid-fire snippets of novel information.

    this is reflected in things like ad lib rap...



    ...footwork...



    ...and the repopularisation of todd edwards sampling techniques in pop music...


  2. #857
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    Partly this is speed and connectivity. Eg a letter takea at least a day to arrive so they contain a lot of information. A telegram arrives much faster. Stop.
    Or those computers that make two billion micro trades a second on the financial markets

  3. #858
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    I can't remember if it was touched on previously but I've been thinking about fragmentation recently. Everything's being broken up into smaller and smaller pieces. Soundbites, memes, Instagram vids, football highlights, tweets. How many YouTube vids do you actually finish? How many articles do you skim or glance at? I can't remember the last time I watched a full game of football without also browsing online, reading some sort of live comment feed on the game.
    Couple of years ago Amazon did trim the costumer reviews all of a sudden. From that point on you had to willingly click to read the whole review if it was a longer one than the default four lines or so. Could have to do with the smaller smart phone screens though first and foremeost (which of course cause websites being trimmed down, articles shortened etc to be readable on the phones)

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  5. #859
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    "A heap of broken images,"

  6. #860
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    Quote Originally Posted by yyaldrin View Post
    what text of burroughs is that that you are referring to? it sounds interesting.
    It's just something he said over the years.

    Walters: What always attracted me when I first heard about that—I suppose, a lot of students at the time—it seemed to introduce a random effect, a found work, do you know what I mean? I wonder if it was so random as all that.

    Burroughs: Well, how random is random? Uh…

    Walters: Well, let’s put it like this. I was in a pub in Charlotte Street, of all places, in Soho, and a mate of mine had read Nova Express—this was ‘64, ‘65—was talking about this, “You must buy this book,” and started to try and explain to me his interpretation of cut-up and fold-in techniques, which he probably got wrong. And I couldn’t remember the name of the book when I got outside, and then an Express Dairy van from the Express Dairies came by, and I thought, “Express, Nova Express!” And I thought, “That’s what he’s trying to tell us. Random events can have a hidden meaning. We can get messages.” But I don’t think that’s what you see in it, is it?

    Burroughs: Oh, exactly. Exactly what I see in it. These juxtapositions between what you’re thinking, if you’re walking down the street, and what you see, that was exactly what I was introducing. You see, life is a cut-up. Every time you walk down the street or look out the window, your consciousness is cut by random factors, and then you begin to realize that they’re not so random, that this is saying something to you.

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  8. #861
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    did anyone ever read something by esther leslie? i think some of the ideas put forward in this thread (or in "the surface" thread) are also discussed in her book "liquid crystals: the science and art of a fluid form". gonna find myself a copy and report back.

    While it is responsible for today s abundance of flat screens on televisions, computers, and mobile devices most of us have only heard of it in the ubiquitous acronym, LCD, with little thought as to exactly what it is: liquid crystal. In this book, Esther Leslie enlightens us, offering an accessible and fascinating look at not a substance, not a technology but a wholly different phase of matter. As she explains, liquid crystal is a curious material phase that organizes a substance s molecules in a crystalline form yet allows them to move fluidly like water. Observed since the nineteenth century, this phase has been a deep curiosity to science and, in more recent times, the key to a new era of media technology. In between that time, as Leslie shows, it has figured in cultural forms from Romantic landscape painting to snow globes, from mountaineering to eco-disasters, and from touchscreen devices to DNA. Expertly written but accessible, Liquid Crystals recounts the unheralded but hugely significant emergence of this unique form of matter. "

    ‘There is every chance that you will be reading Liquid Crystals on a liquid crystal display screen, if not in the year of its release, then somewhere in the future. The ubiquity of LCDs makes them invisible, unthought. Leslie drags us back to the screen, to the discovery of this uncomfortably contradictory state of matter, and to the vast range of implications it has for the way we imagine the materiality and abstraction of our world, from financial liquidity to Superman’s icy Fortress of Solitude. She raises the tantalising prospect that liquid crystals are key not only to images but to perception and to our worldview: the governing metaphor through which we comprehend the rival claims of dialectics and flow. Erudite, lucid, enthralling, Esther Leslie's eclectically logical investigations transform our understanding of the historical generation of ideas and ways of thinking.’ -- Sean Cubitt, Professor of Film and Television, Goldsmiths, University of London
    https://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/l...ystalbook.html

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  10. #862
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    I stumbled across an interview with her on the Verso site recently and have been keeping an eye out for a cheap copy of Synthetic Worlds.

    For a Marxist Poetics of Science: An Interview with Esther Leslie - https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/355...-esther-leslie

    In this career-spanning interview with George Souvlis, Esther Leslie discusses Walter Benjamin, animated film, the history of color, the Historical Materialism project, and the commemoration of the revolutionary past.

    Synthetic Worlds: Nature, Art and the Chemical Industry

    This revealing study considers the remarkable alliance between chemistry and art from the late eighteenth century to the period immediately following the Second World War. Synthetic Worlds offers fascinating new insights into the place of the material object and the significance of the natural, the organic, and the inorganic in Western aesthetics.

    Esther Leslie considers how radical innovations in chemistry confounded earlier alchemical and Romantic philosophies of science and nature while profoundly influencing the theories that developed in their wake. She also explores how advances in chemical engineering provided visual artists with new colors, surfaces, coatings, and textures, thus dramatically recasting the way painters approached their work. Ranging from Goethe to Hegel, Blake to the Bauhaus, Synthetic Worlds ultimately considers the astonishing affinities between chemistry and aesthetics more generally. As in science, progress in the arts is always assured, because the impulse to discover is as immutable and timeless as the drive to create.


    "It was an effort to rewrite Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, drawing out how the intuitions of deranged poetics can be found in documentary actuality, indeed outbid in many regards."

  11. #863

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    finally rematerialising feels good.
    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It says bless the lads and it means bless the lads.
    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    i don't know, probably some marxist cultural theory or something
    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    gabber terrorism is fun but not all the time, sometimes you gotta be sophisticated or sulky for the ladies.
    https://manifestacionesoterica.bandcamp.com/

  12. #864
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    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    my schtick is that twitter, snapchat, vine, et al. have rewired our collective cognition to crave rapid-fire snippets of novel information.
    the constant stuttering stopping and starting of this:


  13. #865
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    Rewinds.

  14. #866
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    Formless. Discorporate.


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    There is even Dematerialisation within dematerialisation:

    I am referring to websites being optimized for smartphone-use. Usually that means a lot less information than the former version of said websites for PC-use (has to be, due to the smaller screens of phones/tablets - you simply need bigger fonts to keep it readable). Also, they usually get their archives axed.

  16. #868
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    "lifehacks"

  17. #869
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    I'd never actually seen the sleeve art for Clear until now, but this is it. This is dematerialisation. It's fucking perfect. All the things I've been waffling on about for weeks re: falling through the mirror and fragmenting on the other side, smartphones etc.

    11502361_800_800.jpg

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