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Thread: artifacts / fog of war

  1. #16
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    It's a form of disruption, that thing plenty of people have referenced of driving into London and getting multiple stations bleeding into one another.

    "When I switch to more off-radar radio stations, it's for a different thing ó it's like a sort of resistance to listening to the music that's not on a stay-able frequency, so you have to align with the frequency but also engage somehow with the music. I like that sort of level of interference, and this is why I like artists who go into that area of static and subtle noise, spectral noise, ambience and whatever. Itís just funny at times, because you'll try and tune it and this classical radio station will start to emerge into that whole thing, and this bashment with like flippin' Chopinís whatever symphony playing in the background or something like that. That gives me inspiration more than anything else."

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    Would you class using this stuff to project an imagined past as forward or backward looking?

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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    It ties in with that very profound and thought provoking thing luka was saying about the future being frictionless too. It's a method of inserting friction and resistance where there is none, "denying the future".
    Fixed it

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  5. #19
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    I've never had the slightest interest in Poles music but he was doing a lot of this in the late 90s was it?

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    At a certain point in the degradation of sound you start asking how much little information you can gwt away with having and still transmit some basic excitation or energy.

    I remember listening to one of those soviet things where they use an x-ray to make a smuggled rock record.... just the ghost of a song but very affecting and still contains, in some way, the essence of the music.

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  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    It's a form of disruption, that thing plenty of people have referenced of driving into London and getting multiple stations bleeding into one another.

    "When I switch to more off-radar radio stations, it's for a different thing — it's like a sort of resistance to listening to the music that's not on a stay-able frequency, so you have to align with the frequency but also engage somehow with the music. I like that sort of level of interference, and this is why I like artists who go into that area of static and subtle noise, spectral noise, ambience and whatever. It’s just funny at times, because you'll try and tune it and this classical radio station will start to emerge into that whole thing, and this bashment with like flippin' Chopin’s whatever symphony playing in the background or something like that. That gives me inspiration more than anything else."
    reminds me of this (the whole thing is really good but this part specifically is related):

    The point was vividly brought home to me on a visit to Cologne some years ago when I stepped out of the train late at night and into a cab, an old Mercedes bristling with aerials and reeking inside of diesel and cigarettes. It was just after midnight and miserably cold. The taxi dashboard glowed with the miniature landscape of lights of an airplane cockpit display, and the intercom speaker emitted a continuous stream of overlapping transmissions as if monitoring every available radio channel simultaneously, some voice, some music. The idea of navigating through this communications maze added an extra dimension of excitement to an otherwise routine journey. What else could the driver be listening to? Was he a radio ham expecting distress calls? What could be happening at this normally dead time of night to generate all of this electronic activity? It was like stepping into the opening short-wave chaos of Hymnen, and I realised that the composer was not simply making it up: this was a chaos he must have experienced many times in real life.

    so come to think of it, "hymnen" is a good EARLY example of embracing this stuff in a futuristic, non-nostalgiac way. although of course when it was created maybe radios, etc. still seemed futuristic themselves. someone much later asked stockhausen why he liked radio waves so much and he said "instant electronic music".
    Last edited by mvuent; 29-11-2019 at 10:16 PM.

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    Daumier's paintings of the man on the rope

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    At a certain point in the degradation of sound you start asking how much little information you can gwt away with having and still transmit some basic excitation or energy.

    I remember listening to one of those soviet things where they use an x-ray to make a smuggled rock record.... just the ghost of a song but very affecting and still contains, in some way, the essence of the music.
    i think that would tie in with the idea of "signifying distance" (i.e. removal) i mentioned. there's a sense in which the interference makes what you can make out of the "real" audio more affecting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I've never had the slightest interest in Poles music but he was doing a lot of this in the late 90s was it?

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    the quote's from actress right version? he'd be another example i've never really listened to.

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    Yeah, it's from an interview he did a while back.

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    If you're gonna listen to something of his, I'd recommend Hazyville.

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  17. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Would you class using this stuff to project an imagined past as forward or backward looking?
    definitely forward thinking and exciting imo, although as I mentioned there seems to be less interest in the last few years.

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    Something I like about crackles, snatches and fragments of radio and so on is the idea of an intrusion of another world into this one. It feels like a point where several paths converge for a few minutes, seeing a ghost. That Deleuze quote about a musician being someone who appropriates something from a continuous acoustic flow is something I think about a fair bit.

    ĽOne can conceive of a continuous acoustic flow that traverses the world and that even encompasses silence. A musician is someone who appropriates something from this flow: notes? Aggregates of notes? No? What will we call the new sound from a musician?ę

    Like catching and surfing a wave, the turtles in Finding Nemo riding the East Australian Current.


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  20. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvuent View Post
    definitely forward thinking and exciting imo, although as I mentioned there seems to be less interest in the last few years.
    this stuff seems to be mostly cancelled now, apart from the very light "mousse" approach you mentioned version. so given that i (and probably most people on this site) have some archivist nerd tendencies and have come to like "fog of war" a lot, i want to figure out how to sneak it back into music in interesting ways.
    Last edited by mvuent; 29-11-2019 at 10:33 PM.

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