Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: The Theatre

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default The Theatre

    Anyone go to the theatre these days? Is it still a vital artform or dead as a dodo. On Thurs we went to see a performance of an Alan Ayckburn play by the Lisbon Players who are being turfed out of their spot after 72 years. It was fun but not really a strong argument for theatre's cutting edge...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    I go quite a bit. I didnít go to the theyíre until I was 20 and it took me a long time to feel comfortable doing so.
    I know it sounds dopey but I like the way that when it works itís like a form of magic - conjuring something out of just words and movements. Iíve seen some amazing things in a theatre over the last ten years, so Iíd say itís not dead but I do think it has an image problem - middle class etc. And itís usually bloody expensive.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    I would like to go more... same with everything I guess.
    The people we went with were criticising what they saw as overacting - which I thought was missing the point. But it shows maybe that (some) people don't know how to watch theatre.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    9,902

    Default

    Last thing I saw was Amadeus at the NT. Really enjoyed it. There something magical about theatre, as terrible as it can be.

    I never go unless my parents make me though. Just one of the many things going on in London I don't bother taking advantage of.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    6,007

    Default

    I haven't been in years, but I know people who still go. My aunt raves about Mark Rylance. That Jerusalem thing he did in 2011 was getting all sorts of praise.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    6,007

    Default


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    It's always fun... though maybe as a rule I tend to like the whole experience of going there, drinks etc, more than the play itself. I dunno, I still think the Shakespeare tragedies still have power. I remember seeing Blasted a few years ago though which was a bit different to the normal UK heritage stuff.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    6,007

    Default

    The main thing I remember about my local theatre is they used to serve these little cardboard pots of ice cream with a small spoon during the interval.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    That's exactly what I mean about the experience... something as out of the ordinary and intense as that can overwhelm the mind and, sadly, make the actual play secondary.
    Last edited by IdleRich; 14-12-2019 at 11:32 PM.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to IdleRich For This Useful Post:


  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    My girlfriend said she could tell the theatre was middle class cos the toilets smelled strongly of asparagus.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to IdleRich For This Useful Post:


  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    Accidentally watched a filmed play yesterday. Wanted to watch the Polanski adaptation of the play Venus in Fur which is a film version of a recent play about a guy auditioning someone for a role in a play which is an adaptation of the book by Leopold Masoch. Does that make sense? Anyway by accident downloaded the wrong thing, a different adaptation of the play. In the original I think there are only two actors and the play takes the form of one long audition - this differed in that every ten minutes or so the scene switched to two different actors directed by a different director - but carrying on the next line in the same play. Does that make sense? Anyway this was filmed in the most simplistic sense, one level above just putting a camera in the corner on a tripod - so it felt like actually being in a theatre... but without a bar or loads of luvvies. Without that it fell a little flat. Or maybe it wasn't a very good play. Seems to me to be an overly common device to have people acting in a famous play and their lives start mirroring it - subtlty if it's an arty play, blatantly if it's a horror - and I'm not sure that this added much to the idea. Maybe I should check the Polanski version.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    East Loondon
    Posts
    2,492

    Default

    Was just thinking I never go to the theatre/know nothing about it, then i remembered going to see this recently:

    https://www.timeout.com/london/theat...-jenner-review

    It was absolutely transcendent, completely blew me away. really tried to capture something about the internet experience, being black, identity politics. Blew my head off a bit.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9,735

    Default

    That does sound cool. Where was it at?
    I should say that for me a big part of the fun of theatre (and going to cinema too I guess) is discussing it with friends at the interval and the end. I don't want to dismiss theatre as merely all the stuff around it but I admit that for me it's a big part of the whole experience.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    9,265

    Default

    80% of the time theatre is disappointing and overpriced, but occasionally it's brilliant (often when it's not overpriced). I went to see a very small-scale production Rebel Music recently, and loved it - nuance and heart. I like it when the performers are almost on top of the audience, that immersive feel.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •