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Thread: Essential Directors

  1. #16
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    I think you've nailed it in the first sentence there. It's about that unmistakable trademark. Linklater is a (relatively) recent one who I think fits that description. Christopher Nolan too, tho I got the impression he's not that popular round here

    I've wanted to see Sorceror for ages (and Wages of Fear). Add to the list

  2. #17

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    The other time it works really well is when there is a clear aesthetic, technical or intellectual development, and a sequence of films build on or anticipate each other. Watching the early phases of Visconti (up to and including The Leopard) and Antonioni (up to and including Red Desert) is really worthwhile in this regard.

  3. #18
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    Cronenberg.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Cronenberg.
    If you like him check out this film which should be much more well known, directed by Don McKellar with DC playing a part.

    As for the thread how about Kieslowski, enjoyed his early ones as well as his French stuff

  5. #20
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    Id recommend bresson cos he had a relatively long career, but few films, so its a fairly short run. Hes all about the mundane, the sound design is always great. Theres a few duds (diary of a country priest and pickpocket spring to mind) and i suppose hes a bit samey. But by the time you get to the last one, money, the look has really changed but the same vibe is still there, more so cos of what has come before. I just like his way, and it seems to pay to get into it on a run of his films, cos theyre so sparse and odd. Like, the more bressons you watch, the better you get him. 5 bressons are better than one, as the prophet said.

    If you wanna appreciate a good auteur, rehashing the same themes, you gotta go for howard hawks i suppose, doing his comedies and gangster films with the same characters, but theres barely any mention of him nowadays, history has not been kind maybe.

  6. #21
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    Sorry for lack of replies, been busy. But good suggestions and thoughts thanks, keep 'em coming.
    Yeah Bresson is a good one. I find him quite an unusual director, reminds me of some of those early Fassbinder ones with that kind of naturalistic anti-acting. Money is my favourite of the ones I've seen but I don't remember any of them that well.

  7. #22
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    Hawks might take a bit longer... hmmm. When people talk about the time-barrier I think that sort of applies to me with silent films. Or at least I think I think it does, turns out when I actually watch them (the good ones) I normally do enjoy them. Actually that could be a thread in itself.

  8. #23
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    To go back to some of the points above. Yeah I think you're right Craner... ideally the director I pick would have some kind of developing (or possibly radically changing) aesthetic. I mean, if they just made loads of good films then I wouldn't call it a waste of time, but it would slightly less satisfying. I guess even if they made a load of bad films then I would learn something too but that's not what I'm specifically looking for.

  9. #24
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    I'm also thinking Bela Tarr (thanks Droid), was in a bar at 7am Saturday morning talking to a guy who was very passionate about The Turin Horse and he really made me want to check it out.

  10. #25
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    So... so far, this is what I'm thinking.

    John Cassavetes
    Bela Tarr
    Robert Bresson

    To start with. Now gotta persuade girlfriend and find the time.

  11. #26
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    re The Leopard (mentioned above), i really have a problem with that in that you can only watch it dubbed, either with Lancaster dubbed into Italian, or the rest of the cast dubbed into English, isn't that a bit weird?

  12. #27
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    I don't remember noticing that particularly but I thought about it all the time when watching it.

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    re The Leopard (mentioned above), i really have a problem with that in that you can only watch it dubbed, either with Lancaster dubbed into Italian, or the rest of the cast dubbed into English, isn't that a bit weird?
    I have exactly the same issue with David Hemmings and Profondo Rosso.

  14. #29
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    i keep meaning to do a Bergman binge, as i don't know anything about him other than the Seventh Seal. and I've been meaning to watch Persona for ages since i read something about it being like Mullholland Drive. trouble is my attention span is shot to pieces, and i get the feeling it will be hard work

  15. #30
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    Maybe so... Persona is definitely worth seeing, Hour of the Wolf, Fanny and Alexander (though that is looong). I've never seen Wild Strawberries though weirdly enough.

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