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Thread: ἦθος ἀνθρώπῳ δαίμων (Character is destiny)

  1. #46
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    Mainly though it's because he actively seeks out conflict on here and is unbothered by other people disliking him. If I sense that somebody dislikes me on here, or that I've offended or otherwise hurt them, I am possessed by a sickly anxiety that won't dissipate until I've apologised.

    MASSIVE amyglada, mate.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    See what you did there - twice you used two words ("flashy or flowery" "clunky and earnest") where you could have used one. I do that all the time, too.

    Your neuroticism shines through, here, also - "Maybe", "It's a bit too" - these are phrases I use all the time.

    That's one reason why I'd expect Luka to have low neuroticism, based on what he writes on here/twitter. He doesn't have a lurking anxiety about whether or not he's picking the right word, whether he's telling the whole truth, whether he can commit to what he's saying or not.
    Totally. I don't like saying anything too definite because I could always be wrong and I don't like the rigidity of it.

  3. #48
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    Writing poetry trains you for this. it's not the way you're born or raised. it's work you have to do. Remember Corpsey when you were reading about Pound editing the Wasteland and his fatwa against the word 'perhaps'? Insisting on the definite statement.

  4. #49
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    It's a confidence thing. A fear of coming across as belligerent and inviting hostility.

  5. #50
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    Yeah it is. I had a string of very good role models I was able to learn from. I would, in all honesty, say, actually just copy me. That's what I did. Copied other people who seemed worth copying.

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  7. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I would, in all honesty, say, actually just copy me.
    Yeah, you would.


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  9. #52
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    My vision for dissensus is 50 Lukas all agreeing with each other and saying you're brilliant mate I fucking love you

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  11. #53
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    A forum of geniuses.

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  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Writing poetry trains you for this. it's not the way you're born or raised. it's work you have to do. Remember Corpsey when you were reading about Pound editing the Wasteland and his fatwa against the word 'perhaps'? Insisting on the definite statement.
    I reckon Pound and Eliot had very different temperaments and what Pound instinctively felt Eliot had to train himself to feel (or appear to be feeling).

    (God, there I go again.)

    I know I got it off my mum, btw, she's self-doubt personified.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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  17. #56
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    And actually you can read that temperamental difference in comparing Pound and Eliot's criticism.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

  18. #57
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    Pound's earlier criticism is astonishingly self-assured. Full of definitive statements, about things one might spend a lifetime arriving at tentative conclusions about. Eliot was trained as a philosopher, and mimbling around a topic adding little curlicues of potentiality here and there was second nature to him. The Four Quartets are very much in this register, with what assertive backbone they possess supplied by religious feeling rather than clarity of discernment.

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  20. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by poetix View Post
    Pound's earlier criticism is astonishingly self-assured. Full of definitive statements, about things one might spend a lifetime arriving at tentative conclusions about.
    Was this before or after he went over to the dark side?

  21. #59
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    It's an interesting question whether Pound "went over" to the dark side or simply found, as the dark side made itself world-historically manifest in the form of Italian Fascism, that he was already there.

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  23. #60
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    Eliot was always on the dark side, I think. But then, that's one of the reasons why his poetry is so great.

    Suffering produces great art and damaged people.
    Αι ψυχαί οσμώνται καθ΄ Άιδην.

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