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Thread: William Gibson

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    There's a in the second trilogy that has semi-sentient tags chased around a wall by cleaning programs.
    Shades of Rammellzee's thing of arming/weaponising letters.

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  3. #17
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    Huemans...in the 14th Century the monks ornamented and illustrated the manuscripts of letters. In the 21st and 22nd century the letters of the alphabet through competition are now armamented for letter racing and galactic battles. This was made possible by a secret equation known as THE RAMM:ELL:ZEE.

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    Why its so great is that it's just a throwaway moment.

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    I like that. It's one of the things I like about Pynchon. That you get stuff happening off to the side or in passing with no explanation. It's just there for you to chew on if you feel like it.

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  8. #21
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    Pattern recognition was overtly influenced by Pynchon and that trilogy is pretty good. As Danny says his later work is more elegant and almost entirely shorn of the cringe factor that infected the edges of his earlier, visionary work. His themes over the last 20 years or so have involved teasing out the nuances within the confluence of technology, capitalism and power. At times he has a tendency to over-egg things a bit or veer into techno thriller territory, but his work does have this oblique, disassociated tone, dry observational humour and irresistible momentum.

    The peripheral was good, currently just finished the new one and its ridiculously assured, no grand revelations, but still the work of a master.

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  10. #22
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    Which are your favourites of his?

  11. #23
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    Dunno. There's stuff in every book that I like. Certainly the early works have dated a bit, but its impossible to overstate their cultural importance in shaping views of technology, and even technology itself. The internet would probably be a different place without him, and there'd be no matrix and a million other works of fiction without the sprawl.

    If you wanna pick something up, try the peripheral, then agency - they'll feel most relevant - and then work your way back through the trilogies.

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    The first three, the pulp ones are worth reading. The rest, burn. Although Danny makes a good 'case' for them. Neuromancer obviously is a huge influence on the best film ever made so that's mandatory reading

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    My favourite is Count Zero. It's the silliest and pulpiest. It's got a voodoo theme.

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    is it a pleb opinion to say that he should have been a director or a video game designer or something instead of a novelist? i feel like he's ridiculed this view in interviews but to me it seems accurate.
    Quote Originally Posted by aMinadaB View Post
    spare me

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    I'll probably read the other two Sprawl ones, Burning Chrome and try Pattern Recognition.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mvuent View Post
    is it a pleb opinion to say that he should have been a director or a video game designer or something instead of a novelist? i feel like he's ridiculed this view in interviews but to me it seems accurate.
    A Hideo Kojima?

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    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    A Hideo Kojima?
    i guess, yeah. when i was reading the peripheral it was just striking how the visuals and world were amazing but didn't seem like they were being used to their full narrative potential. the strengths of the novel format don't seem to match what he's most focused on.
    Quote Originally Posted by aMinadaB View Post
    spare me

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    His silliness would definitely be more at home in a video game. Kojima gets away with stuff that wouldn't fly at all in a novel.

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