Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 99

Thread: The great unwashed / popular taste

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    Me and droid spent the arguing about this (sort of) on the Intencity thread.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    9,017

    Default

    It goes to show though that pop music probably doesnít document the listening habits of the young very well. Iíve never ever known a young person who likes Ed Sheehan.

    I donít know how they weight streams vs sales when they do the charts, but I think only old people are buying music these days which means that pure sales alone are completely unreflective.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    It goes to show though that pop music probably doesnít document the listening habits of the young very well. Iíve never ever known a young person who likes Ed Sheehan.

    I donít know how they weight streams vs sales when they do the charts, but I think only old people are buying music these days which means that pure sales alone are completely unreflective.
    Billboard doesn't measure purely by sales anymore which means the likes of Beiber are getting eclipsed by people you've never heard of

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    595

    Default

    I think a lot of people go through this period of obscurantism, but I don't think it's a shallow thing of socio-cultural identity construction aka being cool.

    When you start getting into music, there's an instrinsic allure to the obscure. The obscure knows something. It has secrets, hidden to those who stay ignorant of the dimension in which it operates. A new, higher experential plane kept away beyond the barriers of classic tonality and mellifluence, waiting to be unlocked. At least I felt this thing, where I wanted to learn all these secrets. And of course reality don't really live up to that promise, but there are rewards that make it worth it.

    The problem with this approach is that you go in and assume that everything you don't like is because you just don't get it yet. This is a weird flux to float around in where art seizes to become nourishing because you're questioning yourself and the legitimacy of what you feel when listening to something.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to entertainment For This Useful Post:


  8. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    A lot of the time what you don't like really is something you just don't get yet. And even if that's not that case it's a good assumption to work from. Otherwise you just turn into the equivalent of one of those anti-intellectual boors who say things like "no one really likes Uylesess they're just being pretentious"

    It's not a good attitude that. Keeps you locked in your own stupidity.
    Last edited by luka; 13-02-2020 at 01:27 PM.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  10. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    595

    Default

    When I first encountered this forum, it seemed like it was a window to all these cool secrets about music that no-one else knew. Not obscure music, but this hidden potency in all these excentric genres like jungle, grime and dancehall, uk funky.

    There was a cognitive dissonance that I was drawn towards resolving.

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to entertainment For This Useful Post:


  12. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by entertainment View Post
    When I first encountered this forum, it seemed like it was a window to all these cool secrets about music that no-one else knew. Not obscure music, but this hidden potency in all these excentric genres like jungle, grime and dancehall, uk funky.

    There was a cognitive dissonance that I was drawn towards resolving.
    Now you know it's just a load of cunts talking bollocks

  13. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  14. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    I think it is very important to feel like you are not good enough and have to try harder. But it's bad to think that you're so rubbish that any effort you make will be futile, because you're rubbish. There is a sweet spot. Just the right amount of insecurity.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  16. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,777

    Default

    Great strapline for the forum that

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Corpsey For This Useful Post:


  18. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    A lot of the time what you don't like really is something you just don't get yet. And even if that's noy that case it's a good assumption to work from. Otherwise you just turn into the equivalent of one of those anti-intellectual boors who say things like "no one really likes Uylesess they're just being pretentious"

    It's not a good attitude that. Keeps you locked in your own stupidity.
    Yes, I think it's part of the journey to bounce back and forth between those two approaches and eventually you find your own balance. A place where you trust your intuition and emotional responses enough to discern what has something that you don't quite get and what just doesn't appeal to any part of you.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to entertainment For This Useful Post:


  20. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,777

    Default

    Good post/points entertainment.

    I spend so much futile time worrying about my taste these days. And not even my taste so much as the whole business of reading (it's mainly reading) altogether.

    What am I after? Who am I trying to impress? Am I even enjoying it anymore?

  21. The Following User Says Thank You to Corpsey For This Useful Post:


  22. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,777

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by entertainment View Post
    I think a lot of people go through this period of obscurantism, but I don't think it's a shallow thing of socio-cultural identity construction aka being cool.
    g.
    For me it was a little of column a and b.

    Surely everyone's familiar with the feeling of hating something you used to like BECAUSE NOW ITS POPULAR.

  23. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,826

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    Does Mvuent actually like Hungarian fart music? Does it move him? Will he play it at his wedding? Will he still listen to it and 50 years and be brought to tears?

    Only he can answer.
    There's snobbery and there's reverse snobbery. Lots of people wonder does Barty actually like this 14 year old girl music he keeps listening to. Will be actually still like it as an adult? Will it still find it emotionally and intellectually rewarding?

    Of course it's hard to believe in the integrity of someone else's taste. Incredibly hard. But again, it's worth assuming that people are earnest and like what they say they like

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •