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Thread: Oyster (for Londoners..)

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ness Rowlah
    US workers have RFIDs inserted in their biceps

    hackable and chips that can be cloned that is. These things will go into the ID-cards being debated tonight. ID theft might become easier than ever if the ID cards bill go through tonight.
    that story is very disturbing... especially the comments about revelations... thank you for the link though...

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rewch
    that story is very disturbing... especially the comments about revelations... thank you for the link though...
    my mate rekons he can replicate the tech on an oyster card, he just needs peopleto go in on the gear need to do it with him.

    on the other hand i won't buy one of these cards out of principal that i don't care for anyone i don't know to know my weareabouts more then they need to cos it's not their business.

    my g/f got a letter from the debt collecting people the other day - to this address,wrong postcode (first fault)
    it said she owed them money for a trip to hitchen on the 6th of jan where she didn't check in her oyster card.(a place she's never been)
    Any attempts to contact them by phone lead to an answering machine,(they''ve never called her back about any message she's left) or end up just automatically ringing off .
    some strange hell that.

  3. #33
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    so within a few years we will all be (passively) radio tracked by being forced to get and carry ID cards. ID cards which will probably enable our IDs to
    be stolen out of thin air. The hackers are already on the case -
    http://cq.cx/proxmarkii.pl

    As far as I know, it is not possible to buy a device like the one that I have described above, and an instrument like this is practically essential for anyone experimenting with the latest generation of transponders. If anyone is interested in doing low-level work with RFID tags, then you could presumably save some time by starting with the platform that I have built. I do have many extra bare boards. At some point I intend to freely distribute the schematics, layout, and software, but there is a lot that must first be cleaned up. I will see.

    As an example of the capabilities of this device, I go through the steps involved in cloning a Verichip. This is the same sort of process that would be required to clone any kind of ID-only tag. For a bidirectional (e.g multipage or anticollision) tag, the process would be similar but more complex.
    Last edited by Ness Rowlah; 14-02-2006 at 11:25 AM.
    Ness Rowlah

  4. #34
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    oyster rocks

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mms
    my g/f got a letter from the debt collecting people the other day - to this address,wrong postcode (first fault)
    it said she owed them money for a trip to hitchen on the 6th of jan where she didn't check in her oyster card.(a place she's never been)
    Any attempts to contact them by phone lead to an answering machine,(they''ve never called her back about any message she's left) or end up just automatically ringing off .
    some strange hell that.
    That just sounds like a scam to me, nothing to do with London Underground.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by WOEBOT
    oyster rocks
    pearls?

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rambler
    That just sounds like a scam to me, nothing to do with London Underground.
    nah it's genuine for sure

  8. #38
    Omaar Guest

    Default Cellphone could crack RFID tags, says cryptographer

    SAN JOSE — A well known cryptographer has applied power analysis techniques to crack passwords for the most popular brand of RFID tags.

    Adi Shamir, professor of computer science at the Weizmann Institute, reported his work in a high-profile panel discussion at the RSA Conference here. Separately, Ron Rivest, who co-developed the RSA algorithms with Shamir, used the stage of the annual panel to call for an industry effort to create a next-generation hashing algorithm to replace today’s SHA-1.

    In recent weeks, Shamir used a directional antenna and digital oscilloscope to monitor power use by RFID tags while they were being read. Patterns in power use could be analyzed to determine when the tag received correct and incorrect password bits, he said.

    "The reflected signals contain a lot of information," Shamir said. "We can see the point where the chip is unhappy if a wrong bit is sent and consumes more power from the environment…to write a note to RAM that it has received a bad bit and to ignore the rest of the string," he added.

    "I haven’t tested all RFID tags, but we did test the biggest brand and it is totally unprotected," Shamir said. Using this approach, "a cellphone has all the ingredients you need to conduct an attack and compromise all the RFID tags in the vicinity," he added.

    Full Article

  9. #39
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    Default Police using Oyster to track criminals

    http://technology.guardian.co.uk/new...730002,00.html

    "Police hunting criminals are increasingly seeking information from electronically stored travel records, such as those created by users of the popular Oyster card in London.
    Figures disclosed today show a huge leap in police requests to Transport for London, which operates the Oyster cards used to travel on buses, trains and the underground.

    Just seven information requests were made by police in the whole of 2004, compared with 61 requests made in January this year alone.

    Overall, police have requested to see journey information 243 times, and been given it 229 times, according to figures obtained by a Freedom of Information Act request, the Press Association reported."

  10. #40
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    and there's crime cameras used to catch traffic offenders

    CCTV cameras designed to prevent robbery and other street crime are being used to penalise drivers who commit minor traffic offences.

    Motorists have been handed £100 fines after being caught on film double parking, making illegal U-turns or driving through no-entry signs.

    One CCTV camera in a residential street in Camden, north London, has resulted in more than 2,500 tickets being issued since it was installed last year as part of a pilot project. Its victims include residents who have briefly pulled over to unload shopping.

    The Camden pilot will soon be rolled out across other London boroughs and councils throughout the country will be granted similar powers from 2008.
    Ness Rowlah

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mms
    nah it's genuine for sure

    she got a court summons the other day.



    those crime pictures you get in stations which show young men commiting acts of a violent or criminal nature on public transport are strange aren't they ?
    i was reading them all today at turnpike lane, just blankfaced kids on cameras from strange angles leaving or starting an act.

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