Page 34 of 35 FirstFirst ... 2432333435 LastLast
Results 496 to 510 of 512

Thread: Poetry

  1. #496

    Default

    I remember finding poetry very "difficult" when I was 15 or so. I think the way it's taught in schools is to try and get you to translate the poem. What does the poet mean, in literal / no poetic phrasing etc? It becomes a (joyless) game of trying to crack a code.

    So generally I think that school destroys poetry for teenagers, for years.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Simon silverdollarcircle For This Useful Post:


  3. #497
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,757

    Default

    I didn't like it at all until I was about 30!

    It's hard to believe there was a time when poets were hugely famous and influential on the youth.

    I suppose reading has generally been superceded by other more instantly captivating forms like music, movies and games.

    The literature that appealed to me when I was 16 was the Beats - cos it was about sex and drugs and rebellion. I wasn't interested in the romantic sublime at that time, although I DID have a sort of romantic view of nature and the world (still hadn't lost the vague religiosity I had had throughout primary school).

  4. #498

    Default

    I reckon teenagers are too deep for poetry in a way. Too full of conviction, looking for answers and credos to live by (e.g the beats)

    As I've got older I've got more comfortable in uncertainty , and letting the surface play of things wash over me. More comfortable with not knowing and taking enjoyment in the thing for its own sake rather than what it's telling me. So, more into poetry.

    So err constant shallowness = poetry.

  5. #499
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,383

    Default

    I don't know where people get this funny idea of the poem as a riddle you need to solve and then discard it.

    It's an experience and an event. Things happen. And it does stuff to you.

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  7. #500

    Default

    A fear and distrust of the inexpressible innit. A need to codify and reduce art to information flows. A counter revolutionary strike against its weird power.

    Same impulse is behind artspeak and endless gallery blubs about "the piece explores the relationship between x and y and asks the audience to question z" etc etc

    They're just running scared

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Simon silverdollarcircle For This Useful Post:


  9. #501
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,757

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I don't know where people get this funny idea of the poem as a riddle you need to solve and then discard it.

    It's an experience and an event. Things happen. And it does stuff to you.
    Modernism?

  10. #502
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    10,757

    Default

    My own heart let me more have pity on'
    BY GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS
    My own heart let me more have pity on; let
    Me live to my sad self hereafter kind,
    Charitable; not live this tormented mind
    With this tormented mind tormenting yet.
    I cast for comfort I can no more get
    By groping round my comfortless, than blind
    Eyes in their dark can day or thirst can find
    Thirst's all-in-all in all a world of wet.

    Soul, self; come, poor Jackself, I do advise
    You, jaded, let be; call off thoughts awhile
    Elsewhere; leave comfort root-room; let joy size
    At God knows when to God knows what; whose smile
    's not wrung, see you; unforeseen times rather as skies
    Betweenpie mountains lights a lovely mile.

    PREACH ON A GUY CALLED GERALD

  11. #503
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Fear - Dublin
    Posts
    9,069

    Default

    It was the piebald horse in next door's garden
    frightened me out of a dream
    with her dawn whinny. I was back
    in the boxroom of the house,
    my brother's room now,
    full of ties and sweaters and secrets.
    Bottles chinked on the doorstep,
    the first bus pulled up to the stop.
    The rest of the house slept

    except for my father. I heard
    him rake the ash from the grate,
    plug in the kettle, hum a snatch of a tune.
    Then he unlocked the back door
    and stepped out into the garden.
    Autumn was nearly done, the first frost
    whitened the slates of the estate.
    He was older than I had reckoned,
    his hair completely silver,
    and for the first time I saw the stoop
    of his shoulder, saw that
    his leg was stiff. What's he at?
    So early and still stars in the west?

    They came then: birds
    of every size, shape, colour; they came
    from the hedges and shrubs,
    from eaves and garden sheds,
    from the industrial estate, outlying fields,
    from Dubber Cross they came
    and the ditches of the North Road.
    The garden was a pandemonium
    when my father threw up his hands
    and tossed the crumbs to the air. The sun
    cleared O'Reilly's chimney
    and he was suddenly radiant,
    a perfect vision of St Francis,
    made whole, made young again,
    in a Finglas garden.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to droid For This Useful Post:


  13. #504
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    I know Luka is a fan of David Jones - i recently re-read In Parenthesis, a long poem based upon his experiences in WW1 - long lines, stuffed with imagery, obscure references and straightforward soldier dialogue, very gripping and quite readable.
    Now I am on to Anathemata - i struggled with this when i tried it years ago - i think because as people have said upthread i was desperately trying to work out the puzzle of it. This time i have thrown myself into it, reading it aloud where i can and i have got so much more out of it. It seems to pre-empt the psychgeographers by decades and you can see where Sinclair gets his mix of arcane and everyday, the loose lines and savage images. The footnotes are fantastic, containing loads of nuggets of knowledge and insight.
    I came back to him after visiting the museum in Ditchling which has lots of his art - he was part of the school of artist/engravers who worked with Eric Gill and others.
    link to online copy of the poem: http://www.johndobson.info/Anathemata/titlepage.html

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to jenks For This Useful Post:


  15. #505
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,383

    Default

    I think the main difficulty With that poem is the vocabulary. I don't think it's necessarily that hard thematically. But unless you are fluent in vernacular Latin and Welsh you're going to have to rely on google a great deal. Which is a pain. And not really practical when you're reading a book on the train or what have you. I was dipping into it again a fortnight ago. Droid might like it, or it might irritate him. Hard to say with droid. Complex character.

  16. #506
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,383

    Default

    A place in Cambridge with a lot of his art. Kettle yard? Is that what it's called?

  17. #507
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,383

    Default

    Mr Tea's wife is an academic and one of the worlds leading experts on Jones' poetry funnily enough.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  19. #508
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    A place in Cambridge with a lot of his art. Kettle yard? Is that what it's called?
    Yep - Kettle's Yard - i love that place.

  20. #509
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    31,383

    Default

    I was going to go deep on this subject but then Barty said he's coming round for a lager so I'll put it on hold

  21. #510
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    leigh on sea
    Posts
    1,755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    I was going to go deep on this subject but then Barty said he's coming round for a lager so I'll put it on hold
    i can wait

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •