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Thread: Albums of the year 2012

  1. #76
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    One of the other things about Splazsh and Hazyville was that I had a different favourite song from it every other day, whilst I've never experienced that with R.I.P

  2. #77
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    i like RIP more than splash as it doesnt have the irritating distortion and faux lo fi FX all over it. plus theres something both empty but also so open about it that means every time i hear it again, its almost like the first time which keeps it totally fresh.

  3. #78
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    I really didn't listen to many full albums this year... Da Mind of Traxman and Bangs and Works vol. 2 were both great though!

    2012 was far more defined by mixtapes for me.

    LOVED the Champion mix for XLR8R - http://www.xlr8r.com/podcast/2012/02/champion
    The big where he drops Mosquito Man from Lighter VIP was one of the biggest 'jawdrop' moments of the year for me, and when he replicated it at his AMAZING set at Butterz at Cable that was one of my rave highlight of the year, if not ever!


    I'm the beardy brare with glasses on the left

    I only discovered Beneath's mix for Blackdown this year, so I count it along with his Fact mix as one of the musical peaks of my year:

    http://blackdownsoundboy.blogspot.co...0/beneath.html
    http://www.factmag.com/2012/05/07/fact-mix-328-beneath/
    Both were pretty seminal as they led to us booking him for a rave!

    Actually Blackdown smacked it as far as introducing new music this year! The Mista Men mix over at his blog soundtracked my exam term, I used it as an alarm clock and it probably stopped me from offing myself: http://blackdownsoundboy.blogspot.co...mista-men.html

    Really enjoyed the Emancipate EP by Narrows when it came out right at the beginning of the year - thought it a very auspicious start!


    The single biggest moment for me musically of the year was Marcus Nasty's June 6 Rinse show. I listened to it as a podcast, on decent headphones just after my final exams, and when the bass came on for the Cause & Affect mix of Let's Go Back, I had the biggest musical epiphany I've had since getting in to dance music mid-2009. Apart from footwork, which took me a while to get into, there's not been a single sound which has developed in that time which is so distinct, so appealing, that an entire scene has formed around it.

    Since listened to that mix I went on to track down nearly every track on it, branching out through artists' back catalogues, trying to piece together the topography and who's who of Jackin. I've listened to it maybe 50 or more times, and I now rate artists I learned about through there - Lorenzo, Hannah Wants, Tom Shorterz, Nick Hannam - as some of my favourite producers. I went from sustaining my interest in music by a combo of maybe 3-4 new fairly interesting 'UK bass'/funky releases a month + hunting for garage/bassline/grime/funky bangers which passed me by the first time around with my sets being maybe 30% new stuff, 30% stuff from the last couple of years, and 40% old classics, to be constantly suprised and amazed at the amount of great new jackin which comes out every single week, and playing sets which are 80%+ tunes from the last few months.

    Lorenzo in particular's had maybe 30 - 40 absolute bangers to his name this year. I can't think of anyone who's come even close.
    Last edited by datwun; 21-12-2012 at 05:16 PM.

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by datwun View Post
    Big up the DJ Referee in the field signalling for the wheel.

  5. #80
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    Yup! he was really good. Also note the guy with the giant flame thrower of a lighter near the stage.

    ALSO: Me and Jambie will be going in on www.innacityfm.com from 6-8 this evening, on a BEST OF 2K12 TIP!!! Get locked, it'll be good! Requests on the chatroom or here and YES we will be playing Ephoria by Loreen.

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gombreak View Post
    One of the other things about Splazsh and Hazyville was that I had a different favourite song from it every other day, whilst I've never experienced that with R.I.P
    Listen to "Raven". Love it when that flutey keyboard sample comes in. That was the exact moment RIP clicked for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gombreak View Post
    One of the other things about Splazsh and Hazyville was that I had a different favourite song from it every other day, whilst I've never experienced that with R.I.P
    Me too. I feel like Splazsh occasionally fell back on gratuitous use of sidechaining and other lo-fi techniques, whereas RIP displays increased confidence as a producer. Now, he really knows when to just let things be and when to drop in that flutey keyboard sample.

  7. #82

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    Petre Inspirescu - Gradina Onirica

    Only heard the samples but so far it could be one of the most beautiful albums released this year. Did anyone see him play at Fabric the other week?

    Ron Morelli's RA mix could be one of the best of the year too.

  8. #83
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    I think RA went for Levon Vincent's Fabric CD as their mix of the year and I'd have to agree with that

  9. #84
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    Giant big Year in review wot I gone and done, if anyone's interested!

    http://dominjapanround4.blogspot.co....-in-music.html

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by datwun View Post
    Giant big Year in review wot I gone and done, if anyone's interested!

    http://dominjapanround4.blogspot.co....-in-music.html
    good read, welcome to Japan!

  11. #86
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    good read man, thanks.

    I disagree with bits of it though. Particularly that Jackin is superior to the current London stuff because it is not internetty:

    The difference between this music history in a blender [approach of Jackin] and the internetty mush I decry in London-centric UK Bass, is that Jackin is the response to a specific Northern tradition, it's not a random assortment of influences gathered from soundcloud and youtube (thought the artists are all very much plugged in, the music disseminated through 2k12 digital channel), but local influences absorbed into the music through a regional IRL scene, and absorbed through the memory of other local scenes. Simply put, jackin is exactly what you'd expect Northern rave music to sound like in 2k12, and it's strong because of its basis in The Real.
    This view that anything which occurs online is inherently 'unreal' compared to IRL interaction, and therefore its products are less legitimate, is really widespread & I find it frustrating. The vast majority of 20 & 21C musical activity has been shaped by trans-/super-geographical flows made possible by new technology & new media - flows of immigration, import/export markets for recorded music, radio, TV - or rather the intersection of those flows with locally constrained cultures, usually in cities. In particular, UK dance music culture has been largely built on the way new media can disrupt entrenched hierarchies - thru pirate radio, rave hotlines etc.

    The internet is no different from these older tools - or I should say it's only a difference of degree, not of kind. Hearing something you like on YouTube that then influences your music isn't fundamentally different from discovering it in your local record shop, hearing it on a radio set or whatever else. It doesn't suddenly become an illegitimate form of cultural dissemination just because its reach exceeds certain material limits (cost of transit, radio broadcast range or whatever other arbitrary ceiling you choose).

    Obviously that's not to say the web's potential to have a fragmentary effect on culture isn't huge. And there is a risk that cultural activity can become atomised, fatally decontextualised, all the things you accuse 'UK Bass' of being. Trap is a good example of how the web's flattening effect can result in ugly cultural misappropriation. Though even there, you could argue that the unthinking scavenge/recycle approach at work isn't so different from the UK's adoption of techno in the early 90s, which plenty of Detroiters saw as nothing less than cultural rape (not to say that trap hybrids 2k12 are remotely as musically important or interesting as hardcore, obv).

    There's clearly some compromise to be struck between decentralised web-culture and the localised, material scenes that have generated so much good dance music in the past few decades. But finding that compromise doesn't involve elevating a young, still-developing tradition (call it the 'scenius' tradition) to the status of a sacrosanct cultural norm. If you're forever holding out for locally-grounded, scenius-driven scenes that follow the precise model laid out by Reynolds in the late 90s then you're obviously going to be bitterly disappointed.

    Finally, saying of Footwork that

    There is quite literally no other movement across the arts - music, literature, visual culture - that is more radical, more important right now.
    when it has existed in much the same form as it does now for over a decade is, to me, worrying. I love footwork but you could argue that its radical moment has already passed, and we're all now just uncovering and enjoying the results, working through the implications of it. I haven't heard a UK or broader US interpretation of the form that didn't sound precisely how you would expect a collision of those two cultures to sound. Some of that jungle/footwork hybrid stuff is great but I can't imagine a whole scene of it being any less moribund that house-derived 'UK bass'.

    OK. Sorry for the rant. Clearly got too much time on my hands this festive season

  12. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by paolo View Post
    I think RA went for Levon Vincent's Fabric CD as their mix of the year and I'd have to agree with that
    Levon Vincent's mix was one of the best mixes this year, but third to Zip's and Ben Klock's for me. It lacks the variation or intensity of either. Hearing Ben Klock's reworking of Josh Wink's Are You There after the Burial edit and that Marcel Dettmann song was easily one of my better musical moments this year. In one that went by fairly slowly.

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pandiculate View Post
    good read, welcome to Japan!
    Thanks G! Where abouts in Japan are you based? I'm moving to Tokyo to teach English~

    Quote Originally Posted by SecondLine View Post
    good read man, thanks.

    I disagree with bits of it though. Particularly that Jackin is superior to the current London stuff because it is not internetty

    There's clearly some compromise to be struck between decentralised web-culture and the localised, material scenes that have generated so much good dance music in the past few decades. But finding that compromise doesn't involve elevating a young, still-developing tradition (call it the 'scenius' tradition) to the status of a sacrosanct cultural norm.
    Jackin is that compromise! It's disseminated all digitally, the artists communicate through facebook and soundcloud - not pirate radio - and its interest in OLD pop songs is clearly a part of our current retromaniacal cultural moment.

    Still the difference is that the curational element of jackin doesn't take place in that totally decentralised, post-geographic manner of too much UK bass, but is composed of the musical elements which make up a Northern, British dance tradition. I can't help but find the links that tie jackin to bassline, happy hardcore, speed garage, northern soul (diva vox, pumping 4x4 riddims, big bass) infinitely more appealing than the decontexualized mush coming out of the post-dubstep diaspora.

    The other difference is its stronger ense of teleology, because with its more coherent sound pallet it's far easier to register changes in time than with the anything-goes UK bass stuff (for example, Jackin from 2010 sounds VERY different to the stuff coming out now).

    Furthermore it's just great rave music! Which is more than can be said for the once great Hessel Audio


    Quote Originally Posted by SecondLine View Post
    Finally, saying of Footwork that


    when it has existed in much the same form as it does now for over a decade is, to me, worrying. I love footwork but you could argue that its radical moment has already passed, and we're all now just uncovering and enjoying the results, working through the implications of it.
    It's not fair to say that it's existed unchanged for over a decade, I don't think. As I understand it, people say that DJ Roc first started tweaking Juke into what we now call footwork around 2003, which would mean it's just reaching 10 about now. And then if you compare the stuff coming out today with the stuff even from 2008 it's clear it's moved forwards a lot.

    I do see what you mean that it's older than genuinely acknowledged, but I think the sounds are moving forwards and it's actually just getting better and better. I do agree that it might be worrying in a meta-cultural sense that this is the most exciting it gets (if anyone knows of anything more radically happening I'd love to hear it!), but as long as it constitutes a living, forward moving scene, and hasn't yet sunk into self-pastiche, I say supporting and advocating for footwork is still worthwhile.

    Quote Originally Posted by SecondLine View Post
    Some of that jungle/footwork hybrid stuff is great but I can't imagine a whole scene of it being any less moribund that house-derived 'UK bass'.
    It would at least be more fun on the dance floor! You are right of course that as of yet, footwork/jungle remains footwork + jungle and hasn't achieved an alchemical melding into something fundamentally different. What I like about the footwork/jungle mashup, in the current context of UK dance floors, is that the 160 bpm speed represents at least a step away from safety, away from sensible. Whereas stuff like Adison Groove (which I do enjoy!) is quite clearly retrograde compared to the original thing, I'd argue Dream Continuum add to and expand upon the footwork tradition.

    Quote Originally Posted by SecondLine View Post
    OK. Sorry for the rant. Clearly got too much time on my hands this festive season
    I very much enjoyed your rant, and am glad you took the time to read and critique my article! Happy holidays!
    Last edited by datwun; 27-12-2012 at 07:10 PM.

  14. #89
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    yeah I get what you're saying about jackin', but I do worry that the merit you find in it is a little too closely mapped to the ways in which reynolds says that hardcore/jungle/garage etc. were good. For me that's an aesthetic framework that only has v limited traction in contemporary music - but then it all comes down to taste doesn't it really. I can see something in Jackin' for sure but it doesn't really do it for me. Likewise for you, probably, a lot of the things I rave about.

    Also I'd say that the problem with 'UK bass' isn't that its reference points are 'decentralised' or that it lacks a geographical centre so much as that it is conservative, unimaginative - just shit, basically. shit music exists in all times & places (I'm thinking of, y'know, Dusky here, not Hessle Audio who I think are great still ).

  15. #90
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    Been a bit out of the loop this year cause of jail and that, but (in no order):

    Richard Dawson - The Magic Bridge (vinyl came out this year so I'll count it)
    Scott Walker - Bish Bosch
    Earth - Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II
    Drcarlsonalbion - La Strega and the Cunningman in the Smoke
    Aesop Rock - Skelethon
    Gunplay - Bogota Rich
    TKO Capone - Duck Season
    Sylvain Chauveau & Stephan Mathieu Palimpsest
    Bobby Womack - The Bravest Man in the Universe
    Art of Burning Water - Love You Dead
    Unsane - Wreck
    Mark Eitzel - Don't Be a Stranger
    Hladowski & Joynes - The Wild Wild Berry
    The Young'uns - When Our Grandfathers Said No
    Emily Portman - Hatchling

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