Corpsey

call me big papa
And the rewatchables and rereadables.

I'm interested in knowing what you listen to repeatedly or have been listening to repeatedly lately.

And if this habit is dying in the internet era where you can constantly scratch the itch for new discoveries.

What are the pros and cons of revisiting the same work of art again and again?
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
The con for me would be deadening of response

Listening to your favourite song so much you end up having it

Is that destructive or creative?
 

thirdform

Well-known member
i don't even care about music anymore. i'm not even sure why i haveit on for 12 hours a day. just seems lonely without it. protestants ruined music.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
what i get sick of is english people obsessed with being djs and thereby surrendering to the tyranny of a 4/4 time signature.

who cares if there are triplets or tresillos as barty says when we can't even have turkish/egyptian aksak jungle in 9/8 and 10/8 in 2019.
 

Leo

Well-known member
I love replaying things I can't quite get my head around. tends to be things a little more experimental. the albums where when they are done, nothing has really stuck in your brain, you haven't cracked it and put it in a box. it's not defined and slotted in, not yet connected to a mood ("when I'm in the mood to listen to X, I know I can scratch that itch by listening to Y.") records that are still in that nebulous limbo, they can be played a couple of times in a row and it doesn't feel like you're doing so, it's just another hours of sounds to explore. oddly, there is sometimes a point where things just click and you are able to label it in your mind. other times, it remains at most just a vague connection to a genre, still mysterious.

these are the types of records I enjoy for the longest periods of time, years.
 

thirdform

Well-known member
yeah i don't think i'll ever get sick of pharoah at his best or coltrane simply because they transcended what we call genre without being a hyper-fascist capitalist omnivore
 

thirdform

Well-known member
the thing is im not supposed to be in music, i was the bloke who was picked on in school, im always moody, a real dork, i prefer keeping to myself most times. that's why its like i try not to think about these things cos then im like why am i even thinking about this in the first place. it's like enforced pleasure ain't it, a pleasure prison as that Achim Szepanski lad said in Simon's book.
 

Leo

Well-known member
yeah i don't think i'll ever get sick of pharoah at his best or coltrane simply because they transcended what we call genre without being a hyper-fascist capitalist omnivore
I was actually thinking this applied more to Alice Coltrane than John. He may have made the greater contribution to music but is more easily defined, Alice is in my mind more "other".
 

Numbers

Well-known member
I do this a lot, listening to the same album or mix over and over again. It helps me to maintain concentration, blocking out other stimuli, whilst setting a certain mood during work. The recently published compilation on environmental music and new age (curated by Visible Cloaks) is one that obviously performs such task well. At first, this might seem at odds with the idea of the tread (music so good it can bear repetition). But it wouldn’t work with any album I didn’t rate in the first place.

Recently I started doing the same with certain labels I have most releases of. Play all of them in shuffle all day long. Stuff from the defunct 1080p, for example. Or Music from Memory.
 

Leo

Well-known member
replayability (new word!) is, for me, far less likely to happen with any forms of pop or rock, 3:00 minute tracks with traditional song structure. they may be great pop songs, but they are too defined. needs to be odd, flowing "other" music.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
the thing is im not supposed to be in music, i was the bloke who was picked on in school, im always moody, a real dork, i prefer keeping to myself most times. that's why its like i try not to think about these things cos then im like why am i even thinking about this in the first place. it's like enforced pleasure ain't it, a pleasure prison as that Achim Szepanski lad said in Simon's book.
These are exactly the people who are into music
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
Presumably all obsessions are extreme metaphors waiting to be born. That whole private mythology, in which I believe totally, is a collaboration between one's conscious mind and those obsessions that, one by one, present themselves as stepping-stones. - Ballard

The internet has hardly eliminated obsessions - in fact, it nurtures it (the echo chamber/bubble effect)

But relating to art - I mean, maybe this is returning to the 'internet music' thread... are people less likely to be obsessed with one or a couple of artists, now they can access all art?
 
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luka

Well-known member
Staff member
As a rule I get bored of myself very easily and have to break down the personality again and again.
 

firefinga

Well-known member
I am re-listening/re-watching and re-reading all the time. For me, I also sense a diference between re-listening to stuff I was actually closely following when it was current (like lots of 90s and 2000s electronical music) and stuff that I never experienced in it's time. I never listen to the former to indulge in nostalgia, I usually connect it to now/the present, since it's always a new experience really. That's also the reason I never bought into that whole "retro-mania". The past can never be re-lived, and if you pit "classics" against current stuff, you get an idea why the classics became classics: they usually have a certain quality. I mean people bemoaning music as being "retro" bc some bloke uses a LinnDrum just robs themselves off a great listening experience.
 
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luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Craner is at the opposite end of the spectrum to me. He has a venomous antipathy towards the new and unfamiliar. There is a small number of things he likes and he likes them more each time he engages eith them. Incredibly he even extends this to sport, rewatching the same matches and events till he knows the commentary off by heart.
 
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