muser

Member
Seems like most Indonesians love dangdut or if it's electronic this weird form of trance / edm with cartoon samples. Traditional stuff has been bastardized with Yamaha keyboards and crack copies of cubase
 

muser

Member
To be honest I probably agree with the statement that timbral qualitym since the 60s, but I fundamentally disagree that there is any way to objectively measure that and think my own opinions are meaningless.
 

thirdform

Active member
The corporate pop model of creating stars and hits, commercial radio since the 80s playing the same 5 tunes on constant repeat all summer long, and most of consumerist attention span being shored up by media conglomerates ––––– These are the actual factors which contribute to everything sounding more the same today than before, not "multi-culturalism".

https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/article/tragic-decline-music-literacy-and-quality

"The results of the study revealed that timbral variety went down over time, meaning songs are becoming more homogeneous. Translation: most pop music now sounds the same. Timbral quality peaked in the 60's and has since dropped steadily with less diversity of instruments and recording techniques. Today’s pop music is largely the same with a combination of keyboard, drum machine and computer software greatly diminishing the creativity and originality"

"Multi-culturalism" itself is both conducted in a fraudulent way, under the auspices of Eurocentrist cultural establishments, as well as on a microscopic scale of what it is purported to be. There are literally thousands of new music developments in Africa alone, never mind the vast ethnic groups in Indonesia or Peru or China, which the Western consumer has zero idea about. South African electronic music had been thriving for 20 years before Europe even knew it existed.

Typical African beat patterns are finally becoming more popular in Europe and the US, but the process is entangled with the corporate model of music manufacturing and distribution. So you have pop dance artists mining cliches and creating "trends" based on superficial mimicry. The problem is not with "Multi-Culturalism" LMFAO.

These guys are only one of countless different local street sounds happening in Tanzania at the moment, randomly "discovered" by some friend of mine, released globally with a video on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1p-936lufI

The world is much more vast and varied than your provincial English brain can imagine.

Yes dear, I have mates affiliated with the nyege nyege tapes project so don't try and spring your ignorant english brain shtick here, besides I'm not English, let alone white, and unlike you I actually spend hours reading up on culture unlike your histrionic rants that you later delete on medium.

Secondly, this is a highly localised scene with (at best) a middle class following in Europe. Not at all comparable to west african pop, which, whether you like it or not, has a huge following in the African diaspora in the UK.

Don't pretend that you didn't get yer tips about the scene in Uganda and Kenya off RBMA (itself a media giant conglomorate run by a fascist) because it's frankly embarrassing. I didn't and I can proudly say that.
 
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thirdform

Active member
Regardless, half of your generalisations about balkan music still make me crease. and your conflation of rhythm with the drum is straight out of a 19th century orientalist's textbook.
 

thirdform

Active member
There is also no such thing as a typical African beat pattern. the rhythms of Morocco, Algeria and Nigeria are totally different, something you should be well aware of if you actually listened to half of the 'traditional' music you copy-pasta'd bitd and learnt how to count rhythms rather than doing a fade out and calling it djing.
 

thirdform

Active member
nah, I'm not gonna be psychoanalysed as constantly being eurocentric, race blind, selling out brown people, a victim of white discourse, etc etc. I continue to study matters concerning to race. I'm no expert but neither does our 'typical african rhythms' expert' get to bully people into thinking he is, going on his past behaviour here and off dissensus. naturally not being white (not even in the sense of passing as white or being accepted as white) I spent my life growing up around black and brown people, whereas our bro was one of them weirdo americans who had a religious conversion after college to atone for his past sins.
 

mvuent

Void Dweller
was kind of hoping those last few posts were going to be the start of a good old fashioned walls-of-text type forum debate between third and zhao. but whatever works.
 
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