suspendedreason

Well-known member
Re conceptronica, it's a music of maps. One of the reasons why it's not interesting is that the map isn't reality. Of course you need the map to make sense of reality. You need a layout of the territory to keep things organized in your mind. Let's say that conceptual thinking is something you do to map out reality, you have to reduce and simplify. You are swayed. Sometimes, you will make impose sense upon things that have none. Reality is granular, not systematized.

Living in the map means you're living imprisoned. Your world becomes governed by concepts. You discard the reality that don't fit the sense. You reject the unfamiliar, the bizarre.

What's great about someone like Picasso or William Blake is that they de-familiarize the things you thought you knew and make you see them for what they are for the first time again. The nature of each thing individually, not how you've transfixed it in your map. Morton Feldman does this for me as well. It erases my map, liberates my reality.
Great post, just wanna draw attention to that.
 

constant escape

winter withered, warm
Re conceptronica, it's a music of maps. One of the reasons why it's not interesting is that the map isn't reality. Of course you need the map to make sense of reality. You need a layout of the territory to keep things organized in your mind. Let's say that conceptual thinking is something you do to map out reality, you have to reduce and simplify. You are swayed. Sometimes, you will make impose sense upon things that have none. Reality is granular, not systematized.

Living in the map means you're living imprisoned. Your world becomes governed by concepts. You discard the reality that don't fit the sense. You reject the unfamiliar, the bizarre.

What's great about someone like Picasso or William Blake is that they de-familiarize the things you thought you knew and make you see them for what they are for the first time again. The nature of each thing individually, not how you've transfixed it in your map. Morton Feldman does this for me as well. It erases my map, liberates my reality.
Is this what hyperreality means, to you? It would make a lot of sense, the "hyper" meaning that one is over-analyzing, over-thinking. And it is as if the map is hovering, so to speak, over the territory.

Albeit more of a literal description of an abstract concept, all the talk of spatial relations as if we are talking about physical objects and not metaphysical objects.
 
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