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Thread: 60's Dad Canon Psychedelia

  1. #196
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    I found a piece of folded mesh fabric on a trip which when you pushed the top layer made the whole thing move like water in a video game, three of us stood there for a good 20 minutes playing with that.

  2. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvuent View Post
    are there any books on music/art/culture in the 60s that anyone itt would recommend? not necessarily on psychedelia, just something in between boomer-targeted rock star biographies and smart person academic stuff. like energy flash but about the 60s. been meaning to ask this for a while.
    Rob Chapman's Psychedelia and Other Colours is a good, thorough, opinionated book about psych and acid rock - bloody enormous too

    I own but have not read yet but it's supposed to be really good: Too Much: Art and Society in the Sixties - 1960-75 by Robert Hewison

    Documents from the time that I can highly recommend:

    Bomb Culture by Jeff Nuttall, which is about the UK Underground, the roots of the counterculture, not a lot on music but great, vividly account from one who was there

    The Neophiliacs - by Christopher Booker, this is an odd one, a guy who was involved in the satire boom (so the whole Peter Cook, David Frost, Private Eye milieu) but either turned or always was conservative and Christian, it's a critique of the Sixties and the cult of all things new and tradition-breaking, but what's great about is the sense of detail and real-time - basically he seems to have sat there with a pile of newspapers going through the Sixties as it unfolded, so it packed with all kind of details i've never seen anywhere else - covers the gamut from fashion and pop to TV and politics - obviously he's against it all, but through being an enemy he has perceptions about it that are unique. There's a tremendous sense of out of control momentum that brings across the madness of the Sixties.

    another document of that era that is a daft curio from today's viewpoint but very vivid is Playpower by Richard Neville (one of the guys behind Oz the underground magazine)

    Jonathon Green - Days in the Life : Voices from the English Underground, 1961-71 - said to be a really definitive oral history of the British sixties. another 'own but not read' (got a chronic problem with buying books and not reading 'em)

    loads more, especially the US end of things

    modesty ought to prevent me mentioning this but have written a 1/3 of a book on psychedelia (understood expansively to include Krautrock, ambient, etc etc) - albeit written from a psychoanalytical / gender angle - the middle section of The Sex Revolts

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  4. #198
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    oh yeah and one of the best short things ever written on the Sixties is the introduction to Ian Macdonald's book on the Beatles, Revolution in the Head. He sets up the context for them very acutely and pithily.

    the whole book is great though - some of the entries on specific key songs like "A Day in the Life" or "I Am the Walrus" or "Strawberry Fields" are mini-essays on the Sixties, the currents the Beatles were surfing and the waves they were setting in motion

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  6. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    There's famously an LSD reference in Lewis Carrol. I think Deluezes quotation of it is the only reference to psychedelics in his work.
    the innocence of schizophrenia.
    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It says bless the lads and it means bless the lads.
    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    i don't know, probably some marxist cultural theory or something
    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    gabber terrorism is fun but not all the time, sometimes you gotta be sophisticated or sulky for the ladies.
    https://manifestacionesoterica.bandcamp.com/

  7. #200

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    Quote Originally Posted by pattycakes_ View Post
    Les Rallizes Denudes
    it's funny. i hold 'december's black children' and 'double heads' very dear, they're reeesssonant and huge.
    but it feels more like being disillusioned w the psychedelic thing of the 60s rather than 'the outer limits'. its tonality is also either very blues rock or very lullaby.
    the midpoint between the 'whimsy' of early popular-psychedelic culture that catalysed this thread and where we're at now. that early schizoid innocence refracted through the 'horror of the 70s' and thought back on in the 80s and 90s. scene veterans re-iterating the same set lists 100s of times. the alternative soundtrack to 'united red army'.

    also:
    Quote Originally Posted by DannyL View Post
    Psychedelic culture is traced from its beginnings with the hallucinogenic celebrations at Eleusis 2,500 years ago, acknowledging in parallel the ancient shamanic plant drug cultures of South America and Mexico. A permanent alternative spiritual culture of the West is outlined as Lundborg follows the impulse from Eleusis through the Neoplatonism and pantheism of the Middle Ages, the rise of hermeticism and esoteric alchemy during the Renaissance, up to the highly visible psychedelic scenes of the modern world.
    but this is just mckenna's Bit. who came first?
    is this 'alternative spiritual culture' a feasible alternative to keep pursuing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo View Post
    cool stuff, made me think about how creation records tried to redo that sound in the 80s with early pastels, biff bang pop, primal scream, the loft, etc.
    and this end of things feels twinned to rallizes. and feeds right into the valentines. who are, again, tonally nothing special, standard 'indie canon comfort food' by this point. but the live experience of Pure Volume in its time and place, in both cases, is what stuck with people.

    'clair' is sonically a link back to this 60s whimsy thing but fuck, the lyrics:
    "see me, i'm climbing through the clouds,
    the world is changing, colors clash.
    clair.
    see me, i'm climbing round the stairs,
    i cut you with a piece of glass.
    tear up clothes you used to wear,
    and you act as if you just don't care.
    clair."
    it's just straight evil. no two ways about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    It says bless the lads and it means bless the lads.
    Quote Originally Posted by sadmanbarty View Post
    i don't know, probably some marxist cultural theory or something
    Quote Originally Posted by thirdform View Post
    gabber terrorism is fun but not all the time, sometimes you gotta be sophisticated or sulky for the ladies.
    https://manifestacionesoterica.bandcamp.com/

  8. #201
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    Stevphen Shukaitis

    Tue, Jan 28, 7:09 PM (8 days ago)

    to mute-social
    Now available for direct ordering and/or free download…

    Red Days: Popular Music & the English Counterculture 1965-1975
    John Roberts

    Challenges the conventional narratives about English popular music and
    the counterculture of the late 1960s and early 1970s

    The passion, intensity and complexity of the popular music produced in
    England between 1965-75 is the work of an extraordinary generation of
    working class and lower middle class men and women (in alliance with a
    handful of middle-class men and women) who saw in the new music the
    remaking of something bigger than themselves, or more precisely,
    something bigger than themselves that they could guide and shape and
    call their own. In this the ‘use-values’ of popular music underwent an
    unprecedented expansion and diversity during this period. Red Days
    presents how music and action, music and discourse, experienced a
    profound re-functioning as definitions of the popular unmoored
    themselves from the condescending judgements of post-1950s high culture
    and the sentiment of the old popular culture and the musicologically
    conformist rock ‘n’ roll seeking to displace it. The remaking of the
    popular between 1965-1975, accordingly, is more than a revision of
    popular taste, it is, rather, the demolition of old cultural allegiances
    and habits, as forces inside and outside of music shattered the
    assumption of popular music as the home for passive adolescent
    identifications.


    Bio: John Roberts is Professor of Art & Aesthetics at the University of
    Wolverhampton. He is the author of a number of books, including, The
    Necessity of Errors (2010), Photography and Its Violations (2014),
    Revolutionary Time and the Avant-Garde (2015), Thoughts on an Index Not
    Freely Given (2016) and The Reasoning of Unreason: Universalism,
    Capitalism and Disenlightenment (2018)

    PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=981

    Ordering Information: Available direct from Minor Compositions now for
    the special price of £10.

    Release to the book trade June 2020

    Released by Minor Compositions, Colchester / Brooklyn / Port Watson
    Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing
    from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of
    everyday life.

  9. #202
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    i noticed that john roberts book a while ago and made a mental note to get it - how weird they are just giving it away as a free download, five months before the official publication.

  10. #203
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    Well I never, who knew that the only decent pf track was actually by Peckham concept artist https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Latham_(artist)

    Like Latham, members of the rock band, Pink Floyd attended Regent Street Polytechnic. In 2016 Pink Floyd released their collection of rare and unreleased recorded early material in the box set The Early Years 1965–1972. On the second CD of the collection is an extended instrumental improvisation, similar to that of the middle section of their performances of "Interstellar Overdrive", which was produced by Latham. The piece is split across nine tracks on the CD.

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