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Thread: Harold Bloom is dead

  1. #31
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    But interesting that Bloom compares the books which - apart from being long and having moments of stream-of-consciousness - are not similar at all.

  2. #32
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    Sounds like Bloom was full of it.



    I just heard of Bely's Petersburg the other day. Now that sounds like Ulysses. It was published well before too.

    Taking place over a short, turbulent period in 1905, 'Petersburg' is a colourful evocation of Russia's capital—a kaleidoscope of images and impressions, an eastern window on the west, a symbol of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the Russian character. History, culture, and politics are blended and juxtaposed; weather reports, current news, fashions and psychology jostle together with people from Petersburg society in an exhilarating search for the identity of a city and, ultimately, Russia itself.

  3. #33
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    Before Ulysses? I guess modernism was happening all over. The novels were desperate to be written.

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    It was published in Russian in 1913.

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    I been googling it, sounds interesting... but I got Lanark today, still have three hundred pages of Recognitions to go... when am I gonna read that realistically.

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    You still enjoying the Gaddis?

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    http://gaddis-drinking-club.blogspot...bloom.html?m=1

    Bloom (very briefly) on meeting Gaddis/ "The Recognitions"

    Sounds like he was very familiar with the book and read it many times.

  8. #38
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    I found a good pic of Gaddis with Gass, Vonnegut, Barth, Barthelme, Coover and a few others recently. Apparently they had some "postmodernists dinner'. Supposedly they invited Pynchon too, but he didn't turn up.

    1fa8c7cbf8dc977653f7750905725da4.jpg

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    http://gaddis-drinking-club.blogspot...bloom.html?m=1

    Bloom (very briefly) on meeting Gaddis/ "The Recognitions"

    Sounds like he was very familiar with the book and read it many times.
    Nice one, that was more what I was looking for...
    Yes I am enjoying it, was out most of the weekend and didn't read it so was planning an assault on the summit today but instead we're in Lidl stocking up on German sausages.

  10. #40
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    Liza is suggesting that there is a character in The Master And Margarita who has a pseudonym which is intended and as a dig at that affectation (which was popular at the time) in general, and at Bely/Biely in particular.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdleRich View Post
    But interesting that Bloom compares the books which - apart from being long and having moments of stream-of-consciousness - are not similar at all.
    "I recall a most ingenious piece in a Wisconsin quarterly some years ago in which The Recognitions’ debt to Ulysses was established in such minute detail I was doubtful of my own firm recollection of never having read Ulysses."

    (March 1972 letter to Jean [?] Howes)

    "I’ve about reached the end of the line on questions about what I did or didn’t read of Joyce’s 30 years ago. All I read of Ulysses was Molly Bloom at the end which was being circulated for salacious rather than literary merits; No I did not read Finnegans Wake though I think a phrase about “psychoanaloosing” one’s self from it is in The Recognitions; Yes I read some of Dubliners but don’t recall how many & remember only a story called “Counterparts”; Yes I read a play called Exiles which at the time I found highly unsuccessful; Yes I believe I read Portrait of an Artist but also think I may not have finished it; No I did not read commentary on Joyce’s work & absorb details without reading the original. I also read, & believe with a good deal more absorbtion [sic], Eliot, Dostoevski, Forster, Rolfe, Waugh, why bother to go on, anyone seeking Joyce finds Joyce even if both Joyce & the victim found the item in Shakespear, read right past whole lines lifted bodily from Eliot &c;, all of which will probably go on so long as Joyce remains an academic cottage industry."

    (June 1975 letter to Grace Eckley)

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