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Thread: Feral World Globalised Ecosystems

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    Default Feral World Globalised Ecosystems



    Pablo Escobar's Feral Hippos

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    Wild wallaby colonies in the UK


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    Burmese pythons in the Everglades


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    Craner first took me to see the wild parakeets around 2004 when they were still confined to the south west of the city round Richmond. There was a pub with a beer garden that looked out onto an island in the Thames and there they were


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    Feral camels of the Australian outback


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    Saw those green parrots on Hampstead Heath during my infamous acid trip. I had no idea they were there or anywhere in London so it absolutely blew me away, like a visitation from the angelic host.

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    Feral boar in New Zealand (nicknamed Captain Cookers because supposedly descended from pigs Cook released into the wild.)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Corpsey View Post
    Saw those green parrots on Hampstead Heath during my infamous acid trip. I had no idea they were there or anywhere in London so it absolutely blew me away, like a visitation from the angelic host.
    Love stuff like that. Opened a window to the impossible. And they flew in. Wormhole to the tropics.

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    Scorpions on the Isle of Sheppey.



    "It is thought they arrived in the 18th century on merchant ships carrying Italian masonry."

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    Common invasive species traits include the following:

    Fast growth
    Rapid reproduction
    High dispersal ability
    Phenotype plasticity (the ability to alter growth form to suit current conditions)
    Tolerance of a wide range of environmental conditions (Ecological competence)
    Ability to live off of a wide range of food types (generalist)
    Association with humans[18]
    Prior successful invasions[19]
    Typically, an introduced species must survive at low population densities before it becomes invasive in a new location.[20] At low population densities, it can be difficult for the introduced species to reproduce and maintain itself in a new location, so a species might reach a location multiple times before it becomes established. Repeated patterns of human movement, such as ships sailing to and from ports or cars driving up and down highways offer repeated opportunities for establishment (also known as a high propagule pressure).[21]

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    An invasive species might be able to use resources that were previously unavailable to native species, such as deep water sources accessed by a long taproot, or an ability to live on previously uninhabited soil types.

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    The 11th Duke of Bedford introduced the muntjac, a small asian deer, to his Woburn estate at the turn of the century. Escapees successfully bred and have now spread over much of the country. They have since become widespread throughout the Epping Forest district.


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