Neo-Noir Films

version

Well-known member
To Live and Die in LA

Great film, but not sure it fits. It's got the set up and cynicism, but it doesn't look or feel that much like a noir. Something like Deep Cover uses all the tricks - voiceover narration, Dutch angles, shadowy lighting, etc. - in a (then) contemporary setting.
 

version

Well-known member
A few I haven't seen, which I'd like to are -

One False Move (1992)
A Rage in Harlem (1991)
Devil in a Blue Dress (1995)
Point Blank (1967)

Colin Farrell's just done a series with Apple TV along those lines too -

 

DLaurent

Well-known member
Chinatown I watched the first time before I started watching noir. Then I watched it again recently and thought it the most convincing neo noir I've seen. It's brilliant.
 

version

Well-known member
Devil in a Blue Dress (1995)

Watched this last night on YouTube. Decent, although the quality wasn't the best and the audio cut out in places to swerve copyright. Shame Denzel didn't get to do more of them. The Easy Rawlins character's great.

 

IdleRich

IdleRich
But the gap between reading and watching was so large that it took me a while to make the connection between the two.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
Colin Farrell's just done a series with Apple TV along those lines too -


Thought I'd give this a go and after two or three episodes I'm really enjoying it. It's less a series than it is just an enormous number I'd clichés strung together - bur they are a load of clichés I really like so, so far, I'm into it.

The main character (Sugar) is a ridiculous film obsessive like Travolta's character in Get Shorty - they use this trick where they keep cutting in scenes and lines from classic films (mainly noirs). They did pretty much the same thing in the kitsch "classic" Myra Breckinridge which is often (somewhat unfairly in my opinion) described as one of the worst films of all time. I found it quite am enjoyable bit of fluff - though the book it's based on by Gore Vidal is totally different in tone (and I'd recommend it) so why they chose to adapt it like that I've never been quite sure.

Also Sugar carries an a gun that was actually used as a prop gun in The Big Heat (if I remember correctly that's the one where Lee Marvin throws scalding coffee in someone's face, a scene considered so violent as to be controversial at the time) but which is actually a working weapon, a concept which is pretty much the same as Matthew McConahoweveryouspellit's character in The Lincoln Lawyer.

I could probably describe several other direct lifts if i put my mind to it, and I'm sure there will be more to come. Why bother though, they are well chosen and for me they work perfectly well.

There is a bit where Chigurh (sorry Sugar) visits a doctor and he describes to the ignorant (when it comes to classic horror sci-fi films anyway) the bit in The Thing where the doctor places his hand on the man's chest and it turns into a mouth and bites off both his arms - I'll always remember that scene cos I watched it with two friends sharing a bottle of wine, when that happened I jumped so hard I literally threw my wine over everyone. I guess it was a good scene.
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
A few I haven't seen, which I'd like to are -

One False Move (1992)
A Rage in Harlem (1991)
Devil in a Blue Dress (1995)
Point Blank (1967)
Wait up, you've never seen Point Blank? You should put that right.

Not sure I've seen A Rage in Harlem though, is it an adaptation of one of those series of blaxploitation books Hell Up In Harlem, Cotton Comes to Harlem etc I found those strange in that - presumably - for reasons of censorship they avoided the use of the word 'fuck' replacing it always with the apparently far less offensive word "rape" so you get a load of bizarre sentences such as "Rape off you motherraping raper".
 

version

Well-known member
Not sure I've seen A Rage in Harlem though, is it an adaptation of one of those series of blaxploitation books Hell Up In Harlem, Cotton Comes to Harlem etc I found those strange in that - presumably - for reasons of censorship they avoided the use of the word 'fuck' replacing it always with the apparently far less offensive word "rape" so you get a load of bizarre sentences such as "Rape off you motherraping raper".

Yeah, that's right. It's the first of Chester Himes' Harlem Detective novels. "Coffin Ed" and "Grave Digger Jones".

 

version

Well-known member
Thought I'd give this a go and after two or three episodes I'm really enjoying it. It's less a series than it is just an enormous number I'd clichés strung together - bur they are a load of clichés I really like so, so far, I'm into it.

The main character (Sugar) is a ridiculous film obsessive like Travolta's character in Get Shorty - they use this trick where they keep cutting in scenes and lines from classic films (mainly noirs). They did pretty much the same thing in the kitsch "classic" Myra Breckinridge which is often (somewhat unfairly in my opinion) described as one of the worst films of all time. I found it quite am enjoyable bit of fluff - though the book it's based on by Gore Vidal is totally different in tone (and I'd recommend it) so why they chose to adapt it like that I've never been quite sure.

Also Sugar carries an a gun that was actually used as a prop gun in The Big Heat (if I remember correctly that's the one where Lee Marvin throws scalding coffee in someone's face, a scene considered so violent as to be controversial at the time) but which is actually a working weapon, a concept which is pretty much the same as Matthew McConahoweveryouspellit's character in The Lincoln Lawyer.

I could probably describe several other direct lifts if i put my mind to it, and I'm sure there will be more to come. Why bother though, they are well chosen and for me they work perfectly well.

There is a bit where Chigurh (sorry Sugar) visits a doctor and he describes to the ignorant (when it comes to classic horror sci-fi films anyway) the bit in The Thing where the doctor places his hand on the man's chest and it turns into a mouth and bites off both his arms - I'll always remember that scene cos I watched it with two friends sharing a bottle of wine, when that happened I jumped so hard I literally threw my wine over everyone. I guess it was a good scene.

That's put me off, tbh. I didn't realise it was a self-conscious thing. I thought it was going to be a straight story about a detective.
 

version

Well-known member
Neo-noirs often are - though by no means always, I'm not saying that

Right, but it's usually in the sense of the story and presentation being informed by classic noir rather than the characters themselves reading Chandler or referencing famous films.
 
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