sufi

lala
I reckon that what will happen next will be that they will maybe last 5 years, barring crises, but by that time the electorate will be frustrated with their lack of ability to change things, and swing horribly towards whatever rightist party is available :( but i really hope that prediction turns out to be wrong (like predicting the tories would start a war to postpone their electoral demise).

My recollection of the last Labour govt is that their achievements were not really obvious at the time, and many not until the tories started dismantling them - the headline issues that Labour dealt with publicly were not necessarily what made a difference. Stealthier improvements, boring stuff like public transport getting better, were slow and more clear in retrospect.

So this imminent new govt have a non-interesting unchallenging manifesto, that's par for the course, and when they are in government they will have their hands tied by reality, but it's definitely better to have leaders who have signed on for social justice rather than capitalist enrichment etc. This latest incarnation of Labour seem unable to manage conflict effectively, and possibly many recent joiners have done so because they wanna be bosses, so there is plenty to be concerned about,

I wonder what's in store for us
 

WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
Labour partially birthed the GFA ending years of killing = tick

As the forthcoming reality wave breaks, as you say in or about a first term/5 years in, when the collective realised-exhale settles from an understanding that we can’t work our way out of so many diverse issues, when individual selfishness continually overrides and trumps broader societal gains - cue the Heir to Farage

Keef will get played by Putin too and whatever we think of Ukraine, could Keef gain any insight into the heap of problems piling up in its territories quickly enough?

Not hopeful - any hope is in the waiting, not anticipating
 

version

Well-known member
My recollection of the last Labour govt is that their achievements were not really obvious at the time, and many not until the tories started dismantling them - the headline issues that Labour dealt with publicly were not necessarily what made a difference. Stealthier improvements, boring stuff like public transport getting better, were slow and more clear in retrospect.

I recently read an old k-punk post from 2005 where he was discussing Blair vs. Howard and really going for New Labour, claiming they hadn't improved anything and the Tories wouldn't be any worse...

Johan Hari tries to make the case for reluctantly voting New Labour today, on the grounds that the Tories are the only realistic alternative and they are manifestly worse than NL. But just what is the threat that Howard's Tories pose? Will they suspend habeas corpus? Can't, Toneeeeee's already done it. Will they shamelessly and shamefully play to the Right wing gallery on immigration? Well, yes, but that's only what the Joker Hysterical Face is already doing. (It's not the war that made me lose any vestigial sentimental attachment to New Labour, it was their disgusting and despicable pandering to the Right on immigration.)

Let's dispense with this idea, once and for all, that New Labour has 'improved' anything. New Labour is the worst of all worlds: Thatcherist managerialism without the Thatcherite attack on vested interests. In the pre-Thatcher 1970s, it took six carworkers to do the job of one; in the post-Thatcher 00s, it takes six consultants to do the job of none (since the mission statement wasn't worth writing in the first place). Same decadence, different beneficiaries.

 

version

Well-known member
The Economist have just endorsed him. Apparently they've only ever backed Harold Wilson and Blair a couple of times when it comes to Labour.
 

Mr. Tea

Let's Talk About Ceps
I guess nobody wants to be seen to be endorsing the party that's likely heading for the worst defeat in the UK's parliamentary history.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
a couple of observations, otherwise known as stuff i've noticed, at the start of this new era. one is that i for the very first time heard jeremey gilbert say something upbeat about a cabinet minister (the timpson one). the other is that its new, or at least a distant memory, to see the guardian going gung ho all out to promote the government, which has been obvious over the last few days. it's partly a kind of relieved and irrepressible optimism spurting out after so long i think. and let them have it. but also the start of a new structure of feeling for the type of person who's making this kind of media, and their audiences. that background grind of having those cunts in charge is gone.
 
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