Drum'n'Bass 2013 (???)

Slothrop

Tight but Polite
Thinking about this, Im definitely afflicted. I mostly listen to drone these days, which is basically music for people who've given up on music.

Yeah, I'm mostly going to drone / noise / neo-psych / weird stuff these days. After all the hyper self-aware sceneology of dubstep (I'd love to see a graph of the most common culprits for "destroying dubstep" on DSF from 2006 to the present), I find it quite relaxing being into a style of music which is extremely unlikely to ever be a victim of its own success but conversely will basically carry on for as long as there are slightly awkward people who like strange noises.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
Droid, I think you have to be careful focusing on the innovation angle alone (apologies for the language, I have been on a work "away day" which I have not got out of my system yet) because all of the Golden Age periods we tend to agree on marry innovation and accessibility. Even locked underground, they have a strong (almost irresistable) pop hook, an addictive sound. And the rate of innovation is fed by an addictive need in the creators and audience, which it feeds as much as forms. There are other things, too, like locale and infrastructure. Essentially, the music always sounds gorgeous, and however inventive and out there (and the more the better), is never hard work. Like early Guy Called Gerald Juice Box 12"s or Show & AG in '95 or Larry Heard getting spaced out.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
I thought the last Trillhouse post was very good, by the way, but the reason I was banging on about that club in Leeds is to refute the idea that these judgements have anything to do with age. I started going there when I was 18 and stopped going there when I was 19. In that time, the music obviously and clearly declined, and it is not a restrospective claim to say that I heard it curdle and stultify week by week, month by month. I can remember having shouty arguments (both sober and shit-faced) over and across the ferocious din about this very fact. "This track has been the fucking same for 5 minutes!" Even in 96/97 the music was developing fast enough to notice a creeping stagnation in very small time frames.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
Another common feature of Golden Age type music is that it tends to be good to dance to, which I know is not high on everybody's list, but I think is quite important. At least, it seems to be the music I enjoy the most.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
Yeah, Im not trying to say that innovation/change is the ONLY marker of quality, not by a long shot, simply that it could be, perhaps one of, if not the only objective measure.
 

droid

Beast of Burden
Another common feature of Golden Age type music is that it tends to be good to dance to, which I know is not high on everybody's list, but I think is quite important. At least, it seems to be the music I enjoy the most.

You're wrong there, its not just good to dance to, it compels you to dance.
 

craner

Beast of Burden
To be fair, it was hard to dance to jungle, because you had to choose between swerving to the bass or doing jittery freak-out moves to the Amen breaks, but when people got either right they looked amazing. People even looked alright going mad to 'Locust' (it was such a release). But nobody looked good dancing to the rubbery 2-step jump up shit that took hold, even the stunning girls, because they got locked into that horrible, stabby 'low-helicopter' jerk, which was depressing to do and look at. That may be one reason speed garage took hold, because you could swerve and sway to it. I don't know, it didn't happen in Leeds. In 1998, I looked for disco and old up-tempo soul instead. (I liked to dance.)
 

droid

Beast of Burden
That was a perennial problem, and one of the reasons that jungle never took off here until the rhythm got locked down in the late 90 's - 'how do ya dance to dis shit?" being the standard complaint.

Personally, a half time skank or full time brock out, was, to me, far more instinctive than the awful, lumpen, endless shuffle of 4 to the floor.
 

Sectionfive

bandwagon house
pre-95 is so incredible still that it is a bit unfair to judge what came after by that standard imho.
Lots of good happening since. An internet dnb whinge remains cathartic as ever though.
 
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paolo

Mechanical phantoms
I didn't get into dnb until about 2000. I think that Andy C's first Nightlife CD was the first dnb thing I ever bought. Used to love listening to L Double doing the top ten on 1xtra on Tuesdays :cool:

Also Tarantula is still a guilty pleasure for me :eek:
 

MK-ULTRA

Active member
Doctor Morbius explains the ancient origins of the Amen Break to star fleet captain Frank Drebbin:
 
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Bellwoods

Active member
What we're seeing in DnB right now is the convergence of a number of elements that have been developing in dance music (somewhat separately) over the past four or five years.

Obviously there's the footwork influence, but it's coming through indirectly, as interpreted by guys like Machinedrum and Om Unit (and the whole Cosmic Bridge thing) - so when it finally works its way out of the London producers it's kind of cleaned up. There are very few (if any) UK producers who can reproduce that raw quality, and the strange rhythmic logic, of Chicago Juke (and now it looks like Rashad is moving away from that sound, towards something more atmospheric). Nevertheless there's something about what's coming from that direction - it's not any one specific stylistic marker, just a sense of space and organization, I guess - that's there in some of the newer DnB tracks I've heard.

Then there's the Autonomic thing, which is drawing on a dark, distopian techno aesthetic, very Detroit-centric, right down to the Robocop and Blade Runner references (Boddika, Jon Convex, etc.). Obviously Vangelis is important, as is Drexciya. The half-step thing (which supposedly comes by way of Dubstep) is also key. It's not "rough", or "rude", or "London" - it's actually remarkably displaced.

So I think it's interesting that those two cities - Detroit and Chicago - have spawned these advanced mutant genres that are now supposedly merging, or compromising, or whatever. It doesn't seem like "Jungle is back" - have you heard the new Samurai comp? Half the tracks are these insanely minimal things with barely any drums - just a hint of them, not much.

Sidenote: Does anyone else miss Consequence's older style? His new stuff is too glitch for me. I miss his early drums.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
surprisingly good thread this. I wanted nothing to do with jungle after 94 but before then I was a kool fm addict.
 
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