The Dissensus Hardcore Poll Is Now Open

Corpsey

call me big papa
Was there a Prodg' / Prod House connection? Only cos they used Baby D's vocal on 'Break and Enter'

Also, was Liam Howlett a break-out genius of hardcore, or did Prodigy just get more props cos they want all rock-y on MFTJGeneration?
 

firefinga

Well-known member
My Ballot for '92:

Roughly chronological according to release dates, the oldest at the top:

Top 30 '92:

Kicks Like A Mule - The Bouncer (Original Mix)
Liquid - Sweet Harmony
House Crew, The - We Are Hardcore
Kid Unknown - Nightmare
SL2 - On A Ragga Tip
Shut Up & Dance - The Green Man
Urban Shakedown - Some Justice (Original Mix)
The Criminal Minds - Baptised By Dub
Sonz Of A Loop Da Loop Era - Far Out (Orig Scratchadelic Mix)
Rachel Wallace - Tell Me Why
2 Bad Mice - Hold It Down
Dance Conspiracy - Dub War (Chapter 1)
Foul Play - Ragatere
Johny L - Hurt you so
Barrington Levy feat. Rebel MC - Under Me Sensi
Sonz of a Loop Da Loop Era - Peace n Loveism (4Hero Mix).
Acen Trip II the Moon 1,2,3
Kaotic Chemistry - Drum Trip II
Rufige Cru - Darkrider
Bay B Kane - Ravin' In The Twilight
Egyptian Empire - The Horn Track
Jungle House Crew - Let Me Take You
Urban shakedown - Bass Shake
4 Hero - Journey From The Light
Acen - Close your Eyes (Optikonfusion Mix)
Nino - The Gun
Tek 9 - Del de Go Go
Wot's My Code - Dubplate
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
ridiculously good. what always strikes me about hardcore is the breadth of the sampling, makes it incredibly diverse and interesting (prince far i for 'baptized in dub', which would be my own #1 pick, as well as cannibalising playing with knives). and the total lack of care for 'good taste', as was said about Jamaican music culture on another thread here.

it's far from a radical tune, but i always loved this one for the unabashed bittersweet melodrama:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdL_PTvtfYE

and looking thru the Production House discogs page, i spotted somewhat of an anomaly at the end of 1991... https://www.discogs.com/label/296-Production-House?sort=year&sort_order=
 
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Corpsey

call me big papa
ridiculously good. what always strikes me about hardcore is the breadth of the sampling, makes it incredibly diverse and interesting (prince far i for 'baptized in dub', which would be my own #1 pick, as well as cannibalising playing with knives). and the total lack of care for 'good taste', as was said about Jamaican music culture on another thread here.
Guess you could say this is why jungle became stultified, ultimately, as it was so reggae/dancehall focused. But then, Bukem and Goldie et al brought jazz and techno influences into it, which for many was pretty much the death-blow as far as jungle goes.

And ultimately you end up with stuff like this

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bYDXQfVcRY

Where there seems to be no influence beyond DNB itself.

To me something has really been lost with the rise of soft synths and pristine engineering. You've lost that patchwork quality, that willingness to play around with ideas, that breadth of influences that is found in hardcore. Everything seems remorselessly linear and snapped-to-grid.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Once software took over the grid took over. I actually enjoyed the blatant rigid grid in grime but usually it's a bit of a downer. Everywhere in modern life you see the software. In architecture and music and graphic design especially
 

baboon2004

Darned cockwombles.
Guess you could say this is why jungle became stultified, ultimately, as it was so reggae/dancehall focused. But then, Bukem and Goldie et al brought jazz and techno influences into it, which for many was pretty much the death-blow as far as jungle goes.
I have a blind spot about 90s dancehall, so tons of jungle leaves me a bit cold for that reason. I liked the stuff that reminded me of hardcore I suppose, that didn't fall squarely into either the dancehall or 'serious music' camps
 

Slothrop

Tight but Polite
To me something has really been lost with the rise of soft synths and pristine engineering. You've lost that patchwork quality, that willingness to play around with ideas, that breadth of influences that is found in hardcore. Everything seems remorselessly linear and snapped-to-grid.
I'm never sure about the technological determinism thing, particularly as regards software. There's no reason people running Cubase can't turn off snap-to-grid, bung in a load of samples, and resist the temptation to compress and EQ and layer the shit out of everything if they prefer the results they get that way.

Also, a bit of an aside, but I'd guess that for drum and bass the change in what was possible was probably less about the rise of software and more about people having the time / money to assemble a bigger and more capable hardware setup. VST instruments weren't even introduced until 99 for instance...
 

Corpsey

call me big papa
I'm never sure about the technological determinism thing, particularly as regards software. There's no reason people running Cubase can't turn off snap-to-grid, bung in a load of samples, and resist the temptation to compress and EQ and layer the shit out of everything if they prefer the results they get that way.
...
You're right, but then the question is why DON'T they? I guess cos most people, justifiably enough, want things to sound as good as possible. I'm sure a lot of people see old skool hardcore as being 'lacking' in terms of sonics.

As for linearity of structure, I think it's fascinating that it came to dominate most genres, in European dance music, anyway.
 
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