Fragments

woops

is not like other people
this is why i've been enjoying j dilla's donuts and madlib's beat konducta recently.

(also meant to mention these two in that funk is dead thread)

change from fragment to fragment and occasional use of repetition is bewildering and even exhilarating.

you might wish for a 5 minute master exposition of this or that fragment, but you never get it, always wanting more.

i wonder if this derives somehow from those old promo cassettes that mixed snippets from the full album into short mixes, sometimes with other material not on the album, which were often as enjoyable or more so than the album!
 

version

Well-known member
In poetry fragments are a modernist device...
A heap of broken images...
Sunlight on a broken column...
And all that.
One thing artists do nowadays is to preview their tracks as snippet, on Instagram for instance, and those snippets often have huge pull, to the extent that the released track an only ever seem a let down.
Yeah, I've noticed this. Wiley previewing tunes on Insta is always like that. Or producers filming their monitors and playing 20 seconds of a new beat.
 
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sadmanbarty

Well-known member
art is about emotional/mood/aesthetic distillation and the longer something goes on the less it’s able to do that.

i’ve always thought still images are capable of being iconic in a way the moving image never can be. pictures of jesus on the cross are infinitely more potent and abundant than moving representations of his crucifixion. it’s a similar thing with that iconic smokey, sepia profile of miles davis; it distills his mythos in a way that any archive footage of him fails to do. no human being can sustain that sense of noir cool, not even really for a couple of seconds. but a photo can suspend it forever, with everything just right.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Nietzsche found his style became more condensed, telegraphic, when he started to use a typewriter.
 

luka

Well-known member
Staff member
Think of the sentences they wrote in the 18th c. All the time in the world.
 
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version

Well-known member
art is about emotional/mood/aesthetic distillation and the longer something goes on the less it’s able to do that.

i’ve always thought still images are capable of being iconic in a way the moving image never can be. pictures of jesus on the cross are infinitely more potent and abundant than moving representations of his crucifixion. it’s a similar thing with that iconic smokey, sepia profile of miles davis; it distills his mythos in a way that any archive footage of him fails to do. no human being can sustain that sense of noir cool, not even really for a couple of seconds. but a photo can suspend it forever, with everything just right.
OdHDCgq.jpg
 
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entertainment

Well-known member
he writes in these sweeping, majestic aphorisms. they're far more iconic than kant or some longwinded writer.

He thought that writing should contain people's thoughts, not their thinking. One of the reasons he loathed academia. In writing he's this intimidating figure, very in yr face, intensely forward, sermonizing in almost confrontational way. Yet in person he was supposedly really gentle and restrained. I was reminded of this when Luka said that he was introverted in person and someone pointed out how eloquent and confident he was on here.
 

DLaurent

Well-known member
Sans Soleil has a unidentifiable version of the song Kisses Sweeter Than Wine playing in a short snippet in the background. Not a song I'm particularly fond of but discussion of it helped get me a girlfriend once.

A bit of reverb and it turns into a Digitalesque (if there is such a thing) dubby sample.
 

entertainment

Well-known member
Do songs, as pieces of art, have an essence, a soul, some non-reducible entity that is conceived upon production, and could only have been conceived in the way that it was, and remains constant through time? Or is it a bunch of different elements, instruments and sounds cobbled together to create the illusory idea of a soul?

Can a fragment of a song give you some of the same nominal experience as hearing the actual song, or is it innately compromized? Does the fragment carry a piece of the essence or only the shadowy residuum?
 
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