Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 5678 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 106

Thread: Cultural Theory Greatest Hits

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by luka View Post
    Get your a JH Prynne and some massive lump of theory and read a page every week or something. It's all too hard for me but I like trying. If I was more methodical in my attack and did some secondary reading I could probably get somewhere but Im not that motivated.
    Prynne is really difficult. I got lost just reading some of what he was saying in that Paris Review interview.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    "No one knows what it means, but it's provocative. It gets the people going."

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    1,712

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Prynne is really difficult. I got lost just reading some of what he was saying in that Paris Review interview.
    i'm half as smart as you guys are but prynne's collected work "poems' is probably the best book i've every bought. i pick it up almost every month. i read the relatively more accessible poems that are included and sometimes i just randomly open a page to have m y self surprised.

    ROYAL FERN

    1.

    By the beads you sleep, laden with scrip.
    How can you love me in dream,
    always walking from field to field.
    You sleep on, seed by snowy drift.

    2.

    In strings it bales from the crest.
    And singing with it I run, half
    fearingly, out of the hot shade.
    Love holds me to the mallet path.

    3.

    In his youth he walked much.
    Tears streamed down his unlined face,
    damping his shirt. Sleep glows
    in its beads, staring the wing blind.

    4.

    Still the snow hums, fetching my life:
    the pain to come, still the key
    takes cover in the chamois case.
    The key is the edge of our day.

    5.

    So the fiat parks by the kerb.
    We hear him switch off, he is
    dreaming of the void. In time,
    soup for the father in open green.

    6.

    Now the family is rejoined. In a
    gold circlet they weep of old fears.
    It is warm here, the sycamore
    pales at last. His to keep. Amass.

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to yyaldrin For This Useful Post:


  5. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    A Theory-Fiction Reading List

    Poetic Theory (Theory which foregrounds its artifice)

    Sψren Kierkegaard — Fear and Trembling (1843)
    Georges Bataille — Visions of Excess: Selected Writings, 1927-1939 (1985)
    Theodor Adorno — Minima Moralia (1951)
    Paul Virilio — Speed and Politics (1977)
    Maurice Blanchot — The Writing of the Disaster (1980)
    Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari — A Thousand Plateaus (1980)
    Jacques Derrida — The Post Card (1980)
    Simone Weil — An Anthology (1986)
    Jean Baudrillard — The Ecstasy of Communication (1987)
    Lawrence Rainey, et al. — Futurism: An Anthology (2009)
    Thomas Ligotti — The Conspiracy Against the Human Race (2010)
    Villem Flusser & Louis Bec — Vampyroteuthis Infernalis (2012)
    Claudia Rankine — Citizen: An American Lyric (2014)
    Dawn Ades, et al. — The Surrealism Reader (2015)
    Donna Haraway — Manifestly Haraway (2016)

    Narrative Theory (Theory told through narrative form)

    Lucretius — On The Nature of the Universe (55 BC)
    Kamo no Chōmei — An Account of My Hut (1212)
    Moses de Leσn — The Zohar (1305)
    Friedrich Nietzsche — Thus Spoke Zarathustra (1891)
    Pierre Klossowski — Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle (1969)
    Walter Benjamin — One-Way Street and Other Writings (1970)
    Hιlθne Cixous — The Third Body (1970)
    Klaus Theweleit — Male Fantasies (1977)
    Luce Irigaray — Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche (1980)
    Manuel De Landa — A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History (1997)
    Catherine Keller — The Face of the Deep (2003)
    Michel Serres — Biogea (2012)
    Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing — The Mushroom at the End of the World (2015)

    Cybernetic Theory-Fiction (Theory-fiction as cultural hype)

    J D Bernal — The World, The Flesh, and The Devil (1929)
    Stanisław Lem — Summa Technologiae (1964)
    Nick Land —Fanged Noumena: Collected Writings 1987-2007 (2011)
    Arthur Kroker — SPASM (1993)
    Orphan Drift — Cyberpositive (1995)
    CCRU — Writings 1997-2003 (2015)
    Kodwo Eshun — More Brilliant Than The Sun (1998)
    Sadie Plant — Zeros + Ones (1998)
    Mark Fisher — Flatline Constructs (1999)
    Reza Negarestani — Cyclonopedia (2008)
    Edward Keller, et al. — Leper Creativity: Cyclonopedia Symposium (2012)
    Robin Mackay & Armen Avanessian — #ACCELERATE (2014)
    Baylee Brits, et al. — Aesthetics After Finitude (2016)
    Benjamin H Bratton — Dispute Plan to Prevent Future Luxury Constitution (2016)
    Cergat — Earthmare (2017)
    Nicola Masciandaro — Sacer (2017)
    Elizabeth Sandifer — Neoreaction: A Basilisk (2017)

    Sci-Phi (Low fiction, high theory)

    Ueda Akinari — Tales of Moonlight and Rain (1776)
    William Burroughs — The Soft Machine (1961)
    Arkady & Boris Strugatsky — Hard to Be a God (1964)
    Ursula K Le Guin — The Left Hand of Darkness (1969)
    Monique Wittig — Les Guιrillθres (1969)
    J G Ballard — The Atrocity Exhibition (1970)
    Angela Carter — The Infernal Desire Machines of Doctor Hoffman (1972)
    Thomas Pynchon — Gravity’s Rainbow (1973)
    Samuel R Delany — Triton (1976)
    Giorgio De Maria — The Twenty Days of Turin (1977)
    Philip K Dick — VALIS (1981)
    William Gibson — Neuromancer (1984)
    Kathy Acker — Empire of the Senseless (1988)
    Umberto Eco — Foucault’s Pendulum (1988)
    Octavia Butler — Xenogenesis (1989)
    Christine Brooke-Rose — Amalgamemnon (1994)
    Alexis Pauline Gumbs — M-Archive: After the End of the World (2018)

    Theoretical Fiction (1: Fiction as theory)

    Margaret Cavendish — The Blazing World (1666)
    Laurence Sterne — The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1767)
    Denis Diderot — Jacques the Fatalist (1796)
    Thomas Carlyle — Sartor Resartus (1836)
    Samuel Butler — Erewhon (1872)
    Alfred Jarry — Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician (1911)
    Franz Kafka —The Great Wall of China (1931)
    Virginia Woolf — The Waves (1931)
    James Joyce — Finnegan’s Wake (1939)
    Robert Musil — The Man Without Qualities (1943)
    Samuel Beckett — The Unnamable (1953)
    Jorge Luis Borges — Labyrinths (1962)
    Italo Calvino — Invisible Cities (1972)
    Eva Figes — Light (1983)
    William Gaddis — Agapē Agape (2002)
    Olga Tokarczuk — Flights (2007)
    Eimear McBride — A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing (2013)
    Laurent Binet — The 7th Function of Language (2015)
    Anne Garreta — Sphinx (2015)
    Joanna Walsh — Worlds from the Word’s End (2017)

    Theoretical Fiction (2: Self-writing as theory)

    Augustine — Confessions (400)
    Michel de Montaigne — Essays (1580)
    Clarice Lispector — Agua Viva (1973)
    Georges Perec — W, or the Memory of Childhood (1975)
    Roland Barthes — A Lover’s Discourse (1977)
    Fernando Pessoa — Book of Disquiet (1982)
    W G Sebald — The Rings of Saturn (1995)
    Svetlana Alexievich — Voices from Chernobyl (1997)
    Chris Kraus — I Love Dick (1997)
    Sara Ahmed — Queer Phenomenology (2006)
    Virginie Despentes — King Kong Theory (2006)
    Paul B Preciado — Testo Junkie (2008)
    Laura Oldfield Ford — Savage Messiah (2011)
    Maggie Nelson — The Argonauts (2015)
    Simon Sellars — Applied Ballardianism (2018)

    Theoretical Fiction (3: Poetry & plays as theory)

    William Blake — The Book of Urizen (1794)
    Sarah Kane — Complete Plays (2001)
    Jena Osman — The Network (2010)
    Keston Sutherland — The Odes to TL61P (2013)

  6. #95
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    I'm not anti theory, not any more, but I think prynnes poems is a better investment than any theory book. And probably smarter too.

  7. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by version View Post
    Prynne is really difficult. I got lost just reading some of what he was saying in that Paris Review interview.
    The letter you just posted that was supposed to be from deleuze. That would be a good way of reading Prynne.

    image.jpg

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  9. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    There are ASMR channels with people reading theory now.




  10. #98
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    Theory, as I said on some other thread, seems to have taken up the whole of the space for exploratory experimental countercultural writing. I'm not very happy with this development.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


  12. #99
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    If I ever wrote something, it wouldn't be theory. I don't get how anyone writes it at all tbh. I can't see the seam. It's like a perfect sphere I can't discern the origin of.

  13. #100
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    It's too difficult for me. I don't have that type of brain.

  14. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    I think the same probably goes for me, but it might just be extreme laziness and sleep deprivation. I can barely concentrate most of the time and find it difficult to sustain any sort of intense thought like that.

  15. #102
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    It's definitely not sleep deprivation on my part. It is partly a lack of motivation. Partly a lack of brains.

  16. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    I feel like a ghost most of the time. That's why it took me so long to read Nova Express. I was reading like five pages every couple of days.


  17. #104
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5,466

    Default

    That time you got me to read the first fifty pages of Ulysses is one of the longest sustained periods of reading I've done in a couple of years, not including stuff online.

  18. #105
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    26,678

    Default

    Bodybuilding stuff. Pumping iron. Hhrrrg. Ugh. Pain is just weakness leaving the body.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to luka For This Useful Post:


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •