PDA

View Full Version : half awake / half asleep



bruno
06-11-2006, 04:09 AM
this year i've experienced the strangest thing.. that in the space between being awake and asleep i have at least a couple of times had to struggle with something that pins me down to the bed, immobilising my arms and oppressing me. a disturbing penomenon.

having zero experience with this sort of thing being that historically i sleep soundly and hardly ever dream (or don't remember, which amounts to the same thing) the nature of these episodes puzzles me. i remember the struggle, the anguish, but for the life of me i haven't found a way to consciously resist or overturn the situation.

has this happened to anyone else here or am i alone in this twilight madness?

michael
06-11-2006, 04:37 AM
This is an acknowledged psychological phenomenon - basically when you're dreaming your brain stops you from moving, but when you wake up it doesn't switch back to waking mode straight away.

Did a quick search and, naturally, wikipedia comes through with a bit of a primer on it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_paralysis

I've never experienced it, sounds horrible to me. I do get pretty wild hypnogogic states (that weird state on the way to being asleep) sometimes.

"Wild" and "sleeping" probably don't belong together. ;)

tate
06-11-2006, 04:40 AM
this year i've experienced the strangest thing.. that in the space between being awake and asleep i have at least a couple of times had to struggle with something that pins me down to the bed, immobilising my arms and oppressing me, a disturbing penomenon.
I have heard of this happening to people when they fall asleep lying on their back.

bruno
06-11-2006, 05:10 AM
thanks for the pointers, both of you.

i have experienced sleep paralysis before but i asked because (and this i neglected to mention) these experiences have been disturbingly physical and in struggle with something, a 'negative entity' of sorts. the pinning down is literal (at the wrists, chest). and the negativity isn't a matter of interpretation, it's literal.

on reflection these episodes have coincided with troubled times on a personal level. but i was used to standard nightmares, this is new to me.

bruno
06-11-2006, 05:17 AM
and basically i just want to sleep! i can skip the introduction thank you very much :confused:

michael
06-11-2006, 05:42 AM
If you have a read of the Wikipedia page on hypnagogia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia) it suggests that it's common to feel pinned down and/or the presence of an entity of some sort.

I hope it goes away, sounds shit.

bruno
06-11-2006, 05:52 AM
yeah, i should take up yoga or something.

edit: michael that entry is an exact description! you learn something new every day.

mms
06-11-2006, 09:43 AM
If you have a read of the Wikipedia page on hypnagogia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogia) it suggests that it's common to feel pinned down and/or the presence of an entity of some sort.

I hope it goes away, sounds shit.

its a common explanation for when people think they've been abducted by aliens.

martin
06-11-2006, 01:28 PM
I used to have this, first few times it freaks you out, like someone kneeling on the back of your neck and you can hear them snarling. I think when you realise it's just sleep paralysis, you eventually get over it. I probably get it once every 3 or 4 months now, and just lie there unable to move, thinking, "Oh for fuck's sake, this is boring, wake up"

Immryr
06-11-2006, 04:31 PM
i get this from time to time, it really does suck.

gek-opel
06-11-2006, 08:48 PM
Ah... sleep paralysis. Used to suffer from this a lot. Strange thing is that once you are used to the terrifying state, it can become useable, in a way. Some people imagine death/aliens/a succubus are crouched on their chest, but once you know whats going on it can be an interesting (tho still unpleasant) pathway into a variety of dreamstates. The best way to describe the basic sleep paralysis is that you are locked in behind closed eyes, but are very much awake. You imagine you are in your bed, inside your room, represented as a fairly believably real space, but things are sitting on you, heroin demons kissing you, your immobile body being flung spasmodically around the room like a pathetic rag doll. Escaping this torture is hard, as even if you awake briefly you will feel yourself being sucked back in. Something unique about this state is a humming sound, and a buzzing, numbing feel in your body, almost like a massive drug high (or that's how I eventually rationalised it, certainly made it slightly more enjoyable)... as you slide into sleep paralysis the first sign is this humming sound, this buzzing feel inside your body, growing louder, stronger, and then you're in, and this buzzing is almost addictive in this state, extremely difficult to break away from. I presume that it is the sensation of having no feeling in yr physical body. This humming sensation is often widely reported in alien abduction cases. The upside of sleep paralysis is that it enabled me to enter various more interesting states (from lucid dreaming to what I call a zero-narrative dream state). The latter of these was the most shocking of all, a dream which rather than merely being a narrative invented as your mind flits out of dreaming and back to wakefulness, was a pure stream of randomised information, perceived in real time as virtual meta-schizophrenia, where every point of information synaesthesically cross references, and draws metaphors with every other.

@Bruno: From experience the best way to properly escape (rather than the multitude of half-escapes which characterise this state) is to keep food or drink by yr bed. If you can manage to eat or drink, for just a few seconds, it wakes up yr metabolism and seems to mean that you do not slide back in. The difficulty is, of course, to get even awake enough to do this.

bruno
06-11-2006, 11:33 PM
Ah... sleep paralysis. Used to suffer from this a lot. Strange thing is that once you are used to the terrifying state, it can become useable, in a way. Some people imagine death/aliens/a succubus are crouched on their chest, but once you know whats going on it can be an interesting (tho still unpleasant) pathway into a variety of dreamstates. The best way to describe the basic sleep paralysis is that you are locked in behind closed eyes, but are very much awake. You imagine you are in your bed, inside your room, represented as a fairly believably real space, but things are sitting on you, heroin demons kissing you, your immobile body being flung spasmodically around the room like a pathetic rag doll. Escaping this torture is hard, as even if you awake briefly you will feel yourself being sucked back in. Something unique about this state is a humming sound, and a buzzing, numbing feel in your body, almost like a massive drug high (or that's how I eventually rationalised it, certainly made it slightly more enjoyable)... as you slide into sleep paralysis the first sign is this humming sound, this buzzing feel inside your body, growing louder, stronger, and then you're in, and this buzzing is almost addictive in this state, extremely difficult to break away from. I presume that it is the sensation of having no feeling in yr physical body. This humming sensation is often widely reported in alien abduction cases. The upside of sleep paralysis is that it enabled me to enter various more interesting states (from lucid dreaming to what I call a zero-narrative dream state). The latter of these was the most shocking of all, a dream which rather than merely being a narrative invented as your mind flits out of dreaming and back to wakefulness, was a pure stream of randomised information, perceived in real time as virtual meta-schizophrenia, where every point of information synaesthesically cross references, and draws metaphors with every other.

@Bruno: From experience the best way to properly escape (rather than the multitude of half-escapes which characterise this state) is to keep food or drink by yr bed. If you can manage to eat or drink, for just a few seconds, it wakes up yr metabolism and seems to mean that you do not slide back in. The difficulty is, of course, to get even awake enough to do this.
very interesting, gek, thank you for that. no aural fuckery here, i'm happy to report. also happy to report that i have experienced the exact same state of non-narrative association several times, though not for some time.

the truth is that i have avoided fucking around with dreams for roughly the same reason that swears gave in another thread, which is that i have to deal with enough garbage awake that i feel my brain deserves a rest, particularly a rest from orders. the question of free association and recombination of things without my conscious intervention is crucial also in that the few times that i do remember something i use it as an oracle, a very effective one. but i'm certainly up for a little exploration now, given these experiences. plus it's my dreamspace, i don't want other entities barging into it!

DJ PIMP
06-11-2006, 11:39 PM
some more posts here:

http://dissensus.com/showthread.php?t=2624&page=2

the undisputed truth
07-11-2006, 06:34 AM
Used to happen to me quite frequently too but i learnt to just relax into it, realize it is a dream like state then consciously try and go back into it with a measure of control. I love it when it happens now, it kind of lets me know I'm alive.

mind_philip
10-11-2006, 01:35 PM
Sounds like hag-riding to me...

nomadologist
12-11-2006, 10:37 PM
heroin demons kissing you, your immobile body being flung spasmodically around the room like a pathetic rag doll

interesting. i would say that once the heroin demons kiss you, trying to wrest free is like two full months of sleep paralysis 24/7, you're awake the entire. fucking. time with your eyes wide open (even on proper doses of subutex) and it's a million times more painful. don't kiss/ride/chase/feed the demon. ever.

this has been a public service announcement.

zhao
21-11-2006, 01:44 AM
last time this happened, I woke up out of a creepy dream, and felt a distinct presence in the room, about 4 feet to the left of my bed. I couldn't see it because my head was turned slightly the other way, but could sense it watching me, like it was taking its time deciding what to do with me. it was the dead of night, and I lay there paralysed for what seemed like an eternity, just waiting for that thing to... I don't know what. it seems the harder you try to scream or move just 1 finger the more paralysis tightens its grip...

on a lighter note, has anyone ever sleep-dialed? my GF once told me in the morning that in the middle of the night I made a phone call, and she apparently later went home and got the message - I had left a message on her home answering machine when she was sleeping right next to me... but she couldn't understand what I said, it was a bunch of gibberish.

polystyle desu
21-11-2006, 02:42 AM
Bruno
Would some kind of stress relief help ?
meditation maybe ...
You said yoga , meditations easy to do at home , doesn't cost

swears
23-11-2006, 06:57 PM
Does anybody ever experience a few seconds of false memories or assumptions while drifting off to sleep? For example once just as I was drifting off to sleep I "remembered" visiting Edinburgh, whereas in real life I've never been there. No real sites or sounds or experiences, just the idea that I'd gone once.

Ach!
20-12-2006, 04:13 AM
I first heard about hypnagogic and hypnopompic states in a Reynolds interview with Aphex in Melody Maker, around the time when SAWII was released. I just thought let you know that.

mms
20-12-2006, 11:05 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadow_people

interesting wiki entry

the definitive book on the phenomenon:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Terror-That-Comes-Night-Experience-centred/dp/081221305X/sr=8-1/qid=1166616256/ref=sr_1_1/203-1037268-5347926?ie=UTF8&s=books

gek-opel
20-12-2006, 08:06 PM
Does anybody ever experience a few seconds of false memories or assumptions while drifting off to sleep?

Not false memories, but impossible thought/language gemometries, which when you SNAP back to wakefulness are caught in the memory, but impossible to describe properly!

mms
20-12-2006, 09:15 PM
Not false memories, but impossible thought/language gemometries, which when you SNAP back to wakefulness are caught in the memory, but impossible to describe properly!

i've had days where whole mornings ive been awake yet, not really known if i am really, i know that sounds like i'm just dosey, but that weird not really being able to work out when i'm asleep or awake it odd.

recently took some us sleeping tablets containing acetaminophen, and diphenhydramine. im sure they diminish parts of your brain as part of the process of making you sleep, i took some and tried to type a sentence and forgot full chunks of the sentence i intended to write, they were just blanks, never take that stuff. it will fuck with you!:rolleyes:

krankissey
27-12-2006, 04:20 AM
i think i've just recently begun to kick my sleep paralysis which has been plaguing me since i was 16.

horrible stuff.

the scariest shit i've ever experienced, without a doubt. there's a direct link between my fascination with ufos and my onset of SP, as i was sure i was in contact with aliens due to the overall experience/waking nightmare.

Parson
27-12-2006, 08:17 AM
only happened once that i remember and while it was in fact real freaky i had known about it for enough years in advance that i quickly realized what was going on and didn't have a panic attack or anything and managed to just go back to sleep

zhao
27-12-2006, 09:07 PM
there's a direct link between my fascination with ufos and my onset of SP, as i was sure i was in contact with aliens due to the overall experience/waking nightmare.

yeah. there are a lot of documented cases of connection between this phenomenon and abduction/visitation.

seems to happen to me when I wake up out of the deepest sleep - haven't happened recently because I think I don't sleep that deeply anymore.

Mr. Tea
15-01-2007, 02:07 PM
This phenomenon is one of those interesting culture-transcending things that people have talked and written and mythologised about for ever. It's thought to be the origin of the 'incubus' and 'succubus' legends (although the latter were no doubt also inspired by nocturnal ejaculation) and all sorts of stories about witches and demons - someone already mentioned 'hag-riding', the feeling (very commonly felt during sleep paralysis) of someone or something sitting on your chest and preventing you from breathing. In European folklore, this often takes the form of a witch-like old woman.

Again, someone's already said it, but the parallels between 'witch-riding' or 'incubus visitation' and 'alien abduction' are startling. Just different interpretations of the same thing.

swears
16-05-2007, 04:05 PM
I was scared shitless last night. Woke up at about 1.30 and could have sworn I saw the silhouette of a bearded man sitting on the chair next to my bed. Just yelled in total shock and ran to the lightswitch, nobody there of course. Fucking creepy.

John Doe
16-05-2007, 04:59 PM
I was scared shitless last night. Woke up at about 1.30 and could have sworn I saw the silhouette of a bearded man sitting on the chair next to my bed. Just yelled in total shock and ran to the lightswitch, nobody there of course. Fucking creepy.

This phenomenon is recognised in central America. A mate of mine experienced it (while in Guatemela, I think) much to the terror of the family he was staying with. Such a visitiation, in their folklore, presages disaster or tragedy of some description. There was a small earthquake, I think, following my mate's visitation which damaged their house? (It's a long time since he told me about it, the details are foggy). The family he was with directly linked the two events. This old man has a name (which I can't remember).

Fascinating psychological phenomena. Well, either that or you're in for some Serious Bad Shit swears...)

hundredmillionlifetimes
16-05-2007, 10:33 PM
I was scared shitless last night. Woke up at about 1.30 and could have sworn I saw the silhouette of a bearded man sitting on the chair next to my bed. Just yelled in total shock and ran to the lightswitch, nobody there of course. Fucking creepy.

Assuming of course this is not the - very common - hallucinogenic side-effect of some psychotropic drug simply triggered by - equally common - underlying psychic blockages, consider just how "fucking creepy" such uncanny irruptions and psychic invasions must be for such people like your friend that you wrote about in another thread, when you stated that he was invaded/demonised by "conspiracy theories about the illuminati and area 51. Reckons people in black BMWs are following him around, constantly paranoid about people staring at him when they obviously aren't". For many, seemingly, the nightmare continues, persistently, long after they've woken up.

The problem, as always, is equally the hysterical over-reaction to those (and by those)experiencing such phantasms ...

bruno
17-05-2007, 03:49 AM
This phenomenon is recognised in central America. A mate of mine experienced it (while in Guatemela, I think) much to the terror of the family he was staying with. Such a visitiation, in their folklore, presages disaster or tragedy of some description. There was a small earthquake, I think, following my mate's visitation which damaged their house? (It's a long time since he told me about it, the details are foggy). The family he was with directly linked the two events. This old man has a name (which I can't remember).
a similar thing happened to a friend who spent a few days on easter island last year. he slept very well until the second night, when in a dream he was accosted by a strange emaciated being. at some point he was at his hostel (wide awake) and saw through the corner of his eye the very thing he had seen in his dreams, a dark grinning figure with large eyes staring back at him as it passed by. he was very unsettled by all this and described the experience to a local, who took him for a fool for not knowing the island is populated by spirits and demons and so on, and that what he had seen was, i forget the name, but one of these spirits. creepy!

hundredmillionlifetimes
18-05-2007, 12:18 AM
This all reminds me of Primo Levi's short poem, Reveille, about a haunted concentration camp survivor, which succinctly evokes the Mobius Strip-like continuum of the parallel between dream and waking (half awake/half asleep) realities:

In the brutal nights we used to dream
Dense violent dreams,
Dreamed with soul and body:
To return; to eat; to tell the story.
Until the dawn command
Sounded brief, low
'Wstawac'
And the heart cracked in the breast.

Now we have found our homes again,
Our bellies are full,
We're through telling the story.
It's time. Soon we'll hear again
The strange command:
'Wstawac'

The first stanza of Levi's poem above has the survivor recalling being asleep in the concentration camp, dreaming hopeful, intense dreams about escaping back home to relate his story, only to be brutally woken up from his dream by the Polish kapo’s ‘Get up!’ ("Wstawac!"). Much later (in the second stanza), while actually at home having survived the war, his story having been related to his family, he now imagines been woken once again by that same terrifying command, ‘Wstawac!’ What is interesting here is that though there is an obvious reversal of the relationship between the dream world and actual reality from the first verse to the second, their formal narrative structure is identical: in both instances, a relaxed and homely domestic world is intruded upon by a traumatic outside in the form of the horrifying command, "Get up!" The apparent move, therefore, is from reality, in the form of the wake-up injunction, intruding on the dream, to the dream, the imagined (or rather, the spectral, hauntological) wake-up call, interrupting reality.

[A really good filmic example of this is near the beginning of Lynch's Mulholland Dr, where an anxious guy in a "Twinkie's" fast-food restaurant tells his colleague about a recurring nightmarish dream he's been having, about being in the very same restaurant as he now is and being aware of a wall behind the restaurant concealing an old dark-faced, emaciated man. The guy proceeds to retrace his nightmare in waking, socialy reality, but dies of fright seeing the old man spring out from behind the wall. In Lynch's films, reality does not have priority over dreams]

Lynch's materialised phantom in Mulholland Dr http://www.timboucher.com/images/mulholland_drive_bum.jpg

Freud’s theory of dreams maintained that the ultimate function of dreaming, even daydreaming, was to permit the dreamer to remain asleep. What he may also have implied by this is that the horrors or traumas that we sometimes encounter in dreams can be much more unbearable even than external social reality itself, so that the dreamer "wakes" up to escape (back) into that ordinary social reality. In other words, what appears in the guise of dreaming, or even daydreaming, is sometimes the ultimate traumatic truth on whose repression social reality itself is constructed: our everyday reality permits us to evade an encounter with true trauma.

Yes, we are the stuff that dreams are made of ["Truth has the structure of a fiction"--Lacan].

HMGovt
22-05-2007, 07:37 PM
This bloke has been awake for 8 days and nearly 15 hours

http://www.studiobar.com/livevideo/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/cornwall/content/articles/2007/05/15/aboutcornwall_sleeplessdiary_feature.shtml

he's been seeing hyperdimensional pixies pouring out of the TV. And that was before bedtime on day one.

Mr. Tea
22-05-2007, 09:50 PM
What a stupid record to attempt. You might as well try setting a record for 'most beer drunk in one session'.