DLaurent

Well-known member
This might explain why I'm into film and to a lesser extent game music these days. Gives it anchor point. Like in something like Forbidden Planet where every physical object seems to make a noise. It's a different way to how I used to listen to music, driving around or playing through decent speakers, now it all comes from my iMac and streaming due to ergonomic constraints.
 

WashYourHands

Well-known member
Piggybacking off work internet, compounded by teaching the crew and working from home, means so much screen time, entering surreal realms and levels

You can get out and I’d take this over being on the eastern front in wwii, it’s the screen time that corrodes patience. No point in going on a Covid rant. One part of the technology is its clear benefits, except the insidiousness of this tether is unyielding
 

luka

Well-known member
lectronic monitoring, in the form of tags, already makes use of location tracking, GPS and radio-frequency technologies. These will be augmented by sophisticated systems that will allow cross-referencing of the location of those under supervision with crime reports. . This will create huge scope to enforce additional restrictions on where they go, who they associate with and what they do.

There is also opportunity to make use of virtual reality for those under house arrest or curfew to support remote learning (think plumbing courses in VR headsets), or to recreate the privations of prison by requiring a certain number of hours in VR headset solitude.


Virtual prisons will cost much less than prisons do – GPS tags are reported to cost £9 per day – and that would certainly feel like a tough punishment, with a high level of restriction felt all the more acutely when living alongside those freely going about their business.
 

luka

Well-known member
In 2020, virtual prisons will continue to be constructed as we expand the role of technology in supervising offenders. But we have no idea if we will be sleepwalking into a more humane and effective world, or a dystopian, more expensive one.

Tom Gash is honorary senior lecturer at University College London’s Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science
 

luka

Well-known member
Recreate the privations of prison by requiring a certain number of hours in VR headset solitude
 
The tag reminds me of this nightmare I had about a little machine embedded in the skin of my leg that was sending out all kinds of information and also sapping my money and energy. I couldn't turn it off or unplug it, but it didn't feel hi-tech, it felt plasticky and cheap in how it looked, it somehow had the feeling of those weird casino pop-ups you'd get on windows 98, trashy and buggy, hastily thrown together. And I couldn't get rid of it, contaminated.
 

luka

Well-known member

What Is the Internet of Bodies?​


Internet of Bodies technologies fall under the broader IoT umbrella. But as the name suggests, IoB devices introduce an even more intimate interplay between humans and gadgets. IoB devices monitor the human body, collect health metrics and other personal information, and transmit those data over the internet. Many devices, such as fitness trackers, are already in use.

Torrents of data on everything from diets to social interactions could help improve preventative health care, increase employee productivity, and encourage people to become active participants in their health.


Artificial pancreases could automate insulin dosing for diabetics. Brain-computer interfaces could allow amputees to control prosthetic limbs with their minds. And smart diapers could alert parents via Bluetooth app when their baby needs to be changed.
 

luka

Well-known member
Amazon has patented technologies for a wristband designed to track and record workers' locations and hand movements. If the wristband senses a lull in productivity, then it would vibrate to nudge the employee to focus.

While it's unclear whether Amazon will ever manufacture this device, such productivity technology could help businesses become more efficient and less prone to error. But because this would give employers highly personal information about their workers, such as information about their bathroom breaks, there's concern about whether the technology described in Amazon's patents might violate employees' right to privacy.
 

luka

Well-known member
In 2017, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first digital pill with embedded sensors that record that the medication was taken. The pill has been successful at treating schizophrenia and some forms of bipolar disorder and depression—conditions for which patients' adherence to treatment is critical to preventing relapse.


Patients can grant caregivers and physicians access to this information through a web-based portal. This can help health care providers confirm whether patients are following their treatment plans.
 

luka

Well-known member
Artificial intelligence (AI) software companies are developing systems that can detect and collect data on human emotions by analyzing facial expressions, voice intonations, and other audio and visual signals.


Some argue these technologies could help reduce car accidents, show companies how consumers feel about their content, and even teach children about empathy. Although these emotional perception technologies are still very new, other facial recognition technologies have been found to be inaccurate when identifying women and minorities, which could potentially put these groups at risk of bias.
 

luka

Well-known member
 
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