Indo Jazz

Chris

fractured oscillations
well i sort of wished to coax some knowledge out of the board. should have spotted the imminent derailment.

:eek: Surely I was the worst on this... sorry Woebot.

any names? i'd like to learn more, have a listen..

They're just recordings of a bunch of local groups and singers as far as I can tell... no one of note in particular... (which is really what I'm interested in hearing, local traditional stuff...) I guess I'd recommend the "Songs and Dances from Czechoslovakia"... the recording quality is pretty bad honestly, but it somehow gives the album this eerie quality, and the music is just so fucking strange in itself, very, for the lack of a better term, primitive sounding. I'd list the names of the Greek records but they're all in Greek lettering...

Not to get off subject of course... *sigh*
 
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mms

sometimes
are there any indo jazz from india though, the reverse indian music which takes up jazz.

there plenty of examples of soundtrack guys mixing it up with funk and disco.

where is sam from state of bengal when you need him?

There are also plenty of examples of the jazz guys mixing it up with the middle east but not specifically india outside of alice's axis and something like the marvellous 'my goals within' by john mclaughlin, which messes about with ragas a bit. Is there any messing about with raga tuning apart from Coltrane's beautiful 'India' on impressions.

those are questions i don't know the answer to!:)
 

STN

sou'wester
There is that ragas and sagas LP by Jan Garbarek and Ustad Fateh Ali Khan - I don't remember being enormously keen on it but I haven't heard it for a fair old while.
 

tate

Brown Sugar
There are also plenty of examples of the jazz guys mixing it up with the middle east but not specifically india outside of alice's axis and something like the marvellous 'my goals within' by john mclaughlin, which messes about with ragas a bit.
Good call - My Goal's Beyond really touched me when I first heard it, still remember the day that i bought it, 19 years ago this summer in fact. Had the Miles-Evans "Blue in Green" and the Mingus "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" versions on it, but also the sublime Peace one and Peace two.

It's maybe worth recalling that McGlaughlin would go on after MGB to play with L Shankar, Zakir Hussain et al as Shakti only a few years later, which was yet another example of a jazz-fusion improviser going further still into the realm of indian improv. '74-78 was when Shakti were at their height, overlapping with Mahavishnu 'course. Interesting period.

Memorable story: I remember very vividly when an ethnomusicology professor of mine in my first semester of college played a Shakti record for our class of classical musicians and mentioned in passing that he and L Shankar (from Shakti etc) had been roommates in college some twenty years before. None of the other students had heard of Shakti but my friend and I were huge Shakti fans, so we immediately rushed up after class to ask the prof about him - at that same moment there was an awestruck classical violin student also running up, saying 'how is that possible? there's not a classical violinist on earth whose intonation is as precise as this indian fellow.' The prof just smiled back and nodded as if to say, 'yes, welcome to the world of indian music'
 

Don Rosco

Well-known member
It's really the case that Indian Classical Music is pretty much jazz anyway, though, right? Highly skilled musicians improvising over standards? Or is it that jazz is pretty much Indian Classical Music? Someone get Winton on the phone, his reign of terror is OVER!
 

zhao

there are no accidents
anyone here into Anouar Brahem? or who is that other arabic jazz guy... oud player... damn
 

zhao

there are no accidents
Highly skilled musicians improvising over standards?

much too loose a description of jazz or anything else... it describes probably most indigenous music of the world. but a valid point can be drawn from this that there are inherent similarities between jazz and much older traditions, from which classical cannon may be seen as a break.

wait... didn't woebot say he hated all jazz music in the hate thread many moons ago?
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
Ah, right - I thought there was just a general confusion between the two phonemes.
I mean, doesn't Chinese have some kind of L-sound - as in Lao Tzu, for instance?
 

zhao

there are no accidents
they do... and there are many R sounds too (minus the rolling ala German obviously)... but they somehow just fuck it up when trying to speak other languages. no idea why
 

Mr. Tea

Shub-Niggurath, Please
I love this kind of stuff - it probably deservses a thread of its own.
(I think the 'language' thread was mostly just about developments in English, wasn't it?)
 

Don Rosco

Well-known member
much too loose a description of jazz or anything else... it describes probably most indigenous music of the world. but a valid point can be drawn from this that there are inherent similarities between jazz and much older traditions, from which classical cannon may be seen as a break.

Well, yeah, it was a laarge generalisation of course. I see what you're saying about classical music too, but I was quite surprised to discover something recently, watching a TV programme made by Derek Bailey about improvising music. Basically, a lot of classical stuff had cadenzas where the performer was encouraged to improvise around the framework. Those sections have since been taken as written in stone, and improvisation is frowned upon by the classical establishment. This was very surprising, to me at least.
 

zhao

there are no accidents
a lot of classical stuff had cadenzas where the performer was encouraged to improvise around the framework. Those sections have since been taken as written in stone, and improvisation is frowned upon by the classical establishment.

makes sense. but i will find out how common this is...

and speaking of unlikely concoctions, new hybrid from the depth of indonesian jungles: a preview of FUSION 3 top of player here.
 

DannyL

Wild Horses
Bump . . .

Been playing this too.

Joe Harriott-John Mayer Double Quintet: Indo-Jazz Fusions (1967)

as per

http://www.woebot.com/2007/07/indojazz.html

Great, great record. I visited Joe Harriot's grave this weekend. I'll try and post a photo in a bit.

(He's buried in Southampton, and I happened to be visiting there this weekend - it was his birthday last week and some guys from another board had visited so I followed in their footsteps)
 
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