version

Well-known member
Did you ever get round to reading ticket? I started it and it seemed really good but I got distracted and never finished it. I think I burned myself out by reading nova express and soft machine back to back - spending too much time in Burroughs world messes with your head

No, not yet. I read eight of his during that period and haven't felt like going back to him yet.
 

Benny Bunter

Well-known member
I found a copy of the jungle book today in the shop down the street, might start that this weekend, see if I like it as much as I did when I read it years ago when I took it with me to India. Colonialist classic.
 
Still enjoying and cannot recommend enough Joel Lane's Scar City (Influx Press). A collection of short stories based around Birmingham, the Black Country and West Midlands (where I live).

There is one story, 'Keep the Night' that heavily takes from Robert Aickman's 'The Swords' (based in Wolverhampton) but is notably set outside of the Midlands in Milton Keynes. Lane's stories are amazing, deeply resonant, rich with life and nihilism.

The title says it all vis-a-vis the lives and territory on a number of levels at once scarred and barren. Scar City, scarcity. Brilliant.
This is really good thank you for the recommendation
 

version

Well-known member
Ivory Pearl, Jean-Patrick Manchette

Very lean. Opens with a group of men smuggling a child into a house, being ambushed by a couple of gunmen and all but one dying after a shootout, knife fight and a car bomb going off. There's a horrible description of a character slicing off someone's hand, still holding the gun, then opening up his throat and chin with some sort of machete.

Apparently it was to be a change of direction for Manchette and was intended as the start of some sweeping cycle of historical novels, but he died before he could finish it and even get started on the subsequent ones.

 

jenks

thread death
Long Road to Deep North. I didn’t read it when it won the Booker probably cos it won the Booker. Well that’s my own idiot fault cos it’s a pretty brutal but compelling story of the Japanese attempt to build a railway in Thailand using POWs. Told from an Australian perspective mainly. Flanagan can really keep all the plates spinning. Probably one of the best war books I’ve read in ages.
 

WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
An embarrassment, zero fluency and expectations around the top two ever entering the PL are rich in lol

Still, plenty of quality games, no real shock exits and all to play for (£20 on England because they have to win a tournament eventually)
 

version

Well-known member
Ivory Pearl, Jean-Patrick Manchette

Very lean. Opens with a group of men smuggling a child into a house, being ambushed by a couple of gunmen and all but one dying after a shootout, knife fight and a car bomb going off. There's a horrible description of a character slicing off someone's hand, still holding the gun, then opening up his throat and chin with some sort of machete.

Apparently it was to be a change of direction for Manchette and was intended as the start of some sweeping cycle of historical novels, but he died before he could finish it and even get started on the subsequent ones.


Took a while to really get going, but I'm into it. He spends about 80 pages methodically arranging the pieces then everything suddenly clicks into place and it takes off into jungle chase sequences, mercenaries jumping out of helicopters, one guy going Arnie at the end of Predator and all sorts.

Some of it feels a bit like the spycraft sections of Pynchon's V. with the old Englishmen discussing geopolitics and lurking around various embassies, and there's a stretch that reminded me of Ballard's Concrete Island. He also has a habit of describing objects fairly meticulously, referring to cars and guns by the model and manufacturer, specifying furniture designs, cataloguing people's outfits. Think Baudrillard's System of Objects or American Psycho minus the satire.

Couple of quotes from that interview I posted in the Situationism thread which seem to highlight the idea behind that approach -

"I demand desperate realism faced with the total absence of richness in material reality and against any attempt to compensate the poverty of this world with an artistic beyond."

"I loved true luxury when I encountered it, a long time ago, on an exotic island that today is ravaged by civil war. I am not interested in false luxury."
 

version

Well-known member
Jean-Patrick Manchette

Jumped straight into another of his. This one's called Nada and it's about a gang of misfits' disastrous attempt at kidnapping an American ambassador.

"Meyer wanted to shoot himself or just go to work - it was hard to say which."
 

IdleRich

IdleRich
An embarrassment, zero fluency and expectations around the top two ever entering the PL are rich in lol

Still, plenty of quality games, no real shock exits and all to play for (£20 on England because they have to win a tournament eventually)

Do they though? I have a feeling I'm gonna live my whole life without ever seeing them lift a trophy.
 
If anyone's feeling overly-bumptious and cheery, this is one remedy

41vlMmmqadL._SY445_SX342_.jpg


Oh, you didn't know the US continues to maintain a "Launch on warning" posture?

The scenario in this case is North Korea launching an ICBM at Washington DC, and a submarine-launched missile at Devil's Canyon nuclear power plant, then a super EMP weapon over the USA, knocking out the grid. Unfortunately, the US response requires ICBMs flying over Russian airspace to get to NK. It doesn't go well.
 
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