Rivers

sus

Well-known member
I do not know much about gods; but I think that the river
Is a strong brown god—sullen, untamed and intractable,
Patient to some degree, at first recognised as a frontier;
Useful, untrustworthy, as a conveyor of commerce;
Then only a problem confronting the builder of bridges.
The problem once solved, the brown god is almost forgotten
By the dwellers in cities—ever, however, implacable.
Keeping his seasons and rages, destroyer, reminder
Of what men choose to forget. Unhonoured, unpropitiated
By worshippers of the machine, but waiting, watching and waiting.
I was just reading this one, it's great
 

sus

Well-known member
I am writing a big essay right now about water metaphors and flow and tao and fluidity and process philosophy and the sea in Moby Dick. so if you have any fun science facts or myths and legends or poems or parables of rivers and seas, the constant flowing changing way of water, I would very much appreciate it

@sufi @luka @catalog @Clinamenic @Mr. Tea @version
Still waiting for this. Really disappointed in everyone.
 

version

Well-known member
Here's some good river content for you.

4364597ed68c3b83d092783ede050589.jpg


 
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sus

Well-known member
At least you tried.

Luke has abandoned me because he is scared I will surpass his symbolic talents

Clinamenic isn't answering because he didn't realize that datastream is also an admissible topic

Mr Tea just hates me
 

sus

Well-known member
You stupid fucking idiot. You think an American Studies major who specialized in Civil War battle history, specifically, the evolution of strategy on the Western front through Grant and Sherman, doesn't know about the shifting paths of the Mississippi? I literally wrote my undergraduate thesis using its riparian drift as a central metaphor.
 

sus

Well-known member
If one were to ask, what is the Mississippi River, or what constitutes the Mississippi River — with its twenty-three hundred miles of snaking southward current, its origins in Northern American tributaries and a massive Canadian drainage basin — one runs quickly into problems. There are the general issues of taxonomical ambiguity: At what point does a stream or creek become a river? At which point does the Gulf of Mexico transition to the Delta, and at what point does the Dela become a river? Then there are issues of definitional and linguistic vagueness: Do we consider “the” river to be all the water within a given, continuous set of banks? Or to include the the riverbed and riverbanks as an amalgamate unit? What then of flooding or groundwater? At what points does flooding and erosion create new banks? Does continuity matter? That is, if the flood zone is continuous with the main body of water, is it still the Mississippi? Do horseshoe lakes — arising when certain twists and turns of meandering rivers are cut off from the main current over time — present a complication? Finally, there are questions of change and flux in the spirit of the Ship of Theseus: Is the present Mississippi the same river which existed only a few months ago, even though all of its constituent water has exited into the Gulf and been replaced? Would it be the same Mississippi in a hundred-thousand years, if geologic change moves its location to an entirely new longitude?
 

sus

Well-known member
Yeah try googling that you won't find anything because it's literally from the first draft of my senior thesis "Following the River: Rationalism, Textuality, and Utilitarianism Onto Grizzly Bear’s 'Graceland'"
 
I am writing a big essay right now about water metaphors and flow and tao and fluidity and process philosophy and the sea in Moby Dick. so if you have any fun science facts or myths and legends or poems or parables of rivers and seas, the constant flowing changing way of water, I would very much appreciate it

@sufi @luka @catalog @Clinamenic @Mr. Tea @version
Had you tagged me, I would have discharged 1 million cubic metres of polished riparian oddities and recollections per second. I've been thinking about this thread all morning.
 

luka

Well-known member
always being born and always dying. both events happening simultaneously and constantly. the spring. the surrender to the sea.
the miracle birth. surrendering individual identity to that larger body. death. merging with that corporate identity.

you also have the river as life-journey. passage through space. passage from innocence to experience. the spring, the crystal stream, uncontaminated, skipping, laughing, and gradually accumlating sediment, weary, dark, waste, guilt, turbid, polluted

this gives you two basic models of time in one.

you've also got the rivers mode of preserving the past in contrast to the earths model. in the soil and rock time is layered in orderly strata. you dig down and the deeper you go the further back in time you travel. the river jumbles all time together. roman coin with cola can.
 
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