shakahislop

Well-known member
but nothing works like that. everything gets nicked. its not just the internet its just how culture has worked for i don't know a hundred years. it's a recurring tragedy. probably everyone should know that by now.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
what came after the hipsters? that's something that's been going through my head recently. it's the social justice warriors and that unnamed world i think. the nonbinary and so on. i don't have the name for it. i think that's the successor anyway. so much more hard edged and serious than hipsters. much more commited. more like the punks and the hippies; there's a programme

the potent moments are usually before these things have proper names. i'm sure its been said on here before. wot u call it and so on.
 

Mr. Tea

Let's Talk About Ceps
what came after the hipsters? that's something that's been going through my head recently. it's the social justice warriors and that unnamed world i think. the nonbinary and so on. i don't have the name for it. i think that's the successor anyway. so much more hard edged and serious than hipsters. much more commited. more like the punks and the hippies; there's a programme

the potent moments are usually before these things have proper names. i'm sure its been said on here before. wot u call it and so on.
I see where you're coming from, but nobody is born a hipster. It's a subculture-slash-aesthetic, isn't it? Like in decades past you had mods and soul boys and whatever (and in fact just earlier iterations of hipsters). So to include people who identify as non-binary sounds quite close to a Biscuity (edit: and Gus-ish) sort of position that being gender-nonconforming in general is just a pose, or a look, or something people do to be cool and part of the in-crowd.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
I see where you're coming from, but nobody is born a hipster. It's a subculture-slash-aesthetic, isn't it? Like in decades past you had mods and soul boys and whatever (and in fact just earlier iterations of hipsters). So to include people who identify as non-binary sounds quite close to a Biscuity sort of position that being gender-nonconforming in general is just a pose, or a look, or something people do to be cool and part of the in-crowd.
fuck have i accidentally summoned these debates out of their quarantined threads. delete it all. i don't want to talk about that. you're right btw tea it does sound like that
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
forgetting that offhand comment about nonbinary people etc. there is something that's emerged no, that fits into the us alt subculture continuum, that succeeds hipsterdom (which is dead and buried).
 

pattycakes_

Can turn naughty
but nothing works like that. everything gets nicked. its not just the internet its just how culture has worked for i don't know a hundred years. it's a recurring tragedy. probably everyone should know that by now.

The net spread it further and wider and sped up the process hundred-fold though. Hipsterism, at its core was simply cherry picking signifiers with the infinite archive as ref material. Was never so easy to access all of that at once. All aesthetics. No credo.

Nothing of real substance has come along since because nothing gets time to lay any proper roots anymore. No time to fortify itself on its own turf. Everything gets swallowed up as soon as the first sparks fly and lives out it's lifespan over a few months if not weeks.
 

version

Well-known member
The categorisation impulse seems almost pathological. I don't sense much joy in it. Just this ravenous appetite for corralling everything in sight.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
The categorisation impulse seems almost pathological. I don't sense much joy in it. Just this ravenous appetite for corralling everything in sight.
one thing i've noticed about the nyc club world is that the good ones don't use the language of subgenres. they go out of their way to find any other way to describe what kind of music is going to be on, all these flowery paragraphs. but beyond 'house' or 'techno' they won't say anything specific. it means i don't have the vocabulary either coz there's no-one to learn it. seems good.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
Basement (the premier techno club in the city) next weekend:

Mord celebrates a decade of pure destruction. The Dutch label is an essential, even era-defining bastion for modern techno. In a field where impact and scale can be prioritized at the expense of the music, Mord has consistently fostered a positively explosive sound that hits with unmistakable personality and loads of hard-edged funk. They’ve achieved this by avoiding cookie-cutter curation and pushing each of their artists to stand out on their own merits, making them a rare buy-on-sight label. Owner Bas Mooy headlines. Drawing on the heavy, heaving energy of his hometown of Rotterdam, his sets unsurprisingly pulsate with psychotic energy and sizzle an industrial afterburn. Quelza draws on the old school. His sets keep the vibes taut, but in his productions he zooms out and gazes on wider panoramas. A hard-edged producer who isn’t afraid to stretch into the cinematic and effusive, Quelza is a standout from the younger generation who is already being recognized by scene stalwarts. Antenes is one of NY’s finest. A true techno head with decades behind the booth, she brings a level of craft and precision as well as a depth of knowledge that cannot be fast tracked. Her sound leans into the raw physicality of hardware synths, paying tribute to the old gods while still sounding years ahead of the pack.
 

shakahislop

Well-known member
Nowadays this weekend, refraining from naming anything aside from gqom (bit pissed that i'm out of town, i'd like to see dj lag)

Nowadays resident and Kindergarten mainstay Ayesha is known for delivering high definition club sounds in her work as both a DJ and producer. Joining her on this night is DJ Lag, the pioneering artist often credited with bringing South Africa's gqom sound to the global stage, and cry$cross, a Brooklyn-based DJ who excels at melding a variety of influences into a high-energy, percussion-forward style.
 

Mr. Tea

Let's Talk About Ceps
I'm sure those memes about specific types of people do a number on the people who make them as much as anyone else.

I remember an extremely try-hard guy called comelately who used to post here (the one who used to go to 'sex club' with his girlfriend) trying to convince me that completely innocuous hobbies were actually really bad and somehow injurious to others in a way he was curiously unable to articulate in any detail.
 

version

Well-known member
M. John Harrison on disaster fiction:

"As a literary artefact, it’s great. But I think the disaster that it represents, the viewpoint on the disaster, is old-fashioned. It’s out of date. It’s a typical 1950s disaster story, in which the disaster is limited. The fiction caps it at both ends. The characters are left with the consequences, and the consequences can be solved by doing the kinds of things that human beings do – make a community, make an allotment, begin the long road back to the world as it was before. My feeling is that this kind of fictional disaster was over once The Day of the Triffids had been written."

"I think they’re reassuring. Brian Aldiss called them ‘cosy catastrophes’. They limit the way we can think about our own disaster. Because what’s happening to us now is clearly not a limited disaster. We live in a state where the disaster doesn’t have a clear beginning and it certainly doesn’t have a clear end."

"You have to be very careful about the words you use here. Managed populations must never know a disaster is taking place around them. Instead we’re offered the idea of the ‘temporary glitch’. There’s a bit of a problem with microplastics, there’s a bit of a problem with the temperature; but, you know, it’s just a glitch, it’s not the end of the world. The disaster used to be the end of the world. It used to be conceivable as the end of the world. What we need now is writers who confront the fact that probably everything is going to be a disaster from now on for quite some time, if not forever."

"The problem with all escapist fiction, which includes all standardised generic fiction, is that, actually, there is always part of the audience which secretly enjoys the imagery."

"And as a result, you have to be careful what you offer them. That said, I think that when the disaster story hit its peak in the fiction of the 1950s and early 1960s, most of those writers were still trying to do right by the idea. They were trying to make warnings about the near future in the light of a visible present moment."

"We need new forms and structures, points of view. You could say a new ideology of disaster, one which suits the disaster we’ve actually got."
 

WashYourHands

Cat Malogen
M. John Harrison on disaster fiction:

"As a literary artefact, it’s great. But I think the disaster that it represents, the viewpoint on the disaster, is old-fashioned. It’s out of date. It’s a typical 1950s disaster story, in which the disaster is limited. The fiction caps it at both ends. The characters are left with the consequences, and the consequences can be solved by doing the kinds of things that human beings do – make a community, make an allotment, begin the long road back to the world as it was before. My feeling is that this kind of fictional disaster was over once The Day of the Triffids had been written."

"I think they’re reassuring. Brian Aldiss called them ‘cosy catastrophes’. They limit the way we can think about our own disaster. Because what’s happening to us now is clearly not a limited disaster. We live in a state where the disaster doesn’t have a clear beginning and it certainly doesn’t have a clear end."

"You have to be very careful about the words you use here. Managed populations must never know a disaster is taking place around them. Instead we’re offered the idea of the ‘temporary glitch’. There’s a bit of a problem with microplastics, there’s a bit of a problem with the temperature; but, you know, it’s just a glitch, it’s not the end of the world. The disaster used to be the end of the world. It used to be conceivable as the end of the world. What we need now is writers who confront the fact that probably everything is going to be a disaster from now on for quite some time, if not forever."

"The problem with all escapist fiction, which includes all standardised generic fiction, is that, actually, there is always part of the audience which secretly enjoys the imagery."

"And as a result, you have to be careful what you offer them. That said, I think that when the disaster story hit its peak in the fiction of the 1950s and early 1960s, most of those writers were still trying to do right by the idea. They were trying to make warnings about the near future in the light of a visible present moment."

"We need new forms and structures, points of view. You could say a new ideology of disaster, one which suits the disaster we’ve actually got."

IMG_1392.jpeg
 

version

Well-known member
This bloke diagrammed the Book of Revelation:

Back in 1919, a Baptist reverend named Clarence Larkin published an unusual book breaking down each verse of the Book of Revelation into charts... Larkin stated that he spent 25 years studying the Book of Revelation from a “Futurist Standpoint” to “show that the Book of Revelation is to be taken literally.”



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